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Archaeology & Anthropology Field Schools
ShovelBums 2016 Comprehensive Archaeology and Anthropology Field School Directory

Region (493/5 )

Asia / Pacific / Australia, Canada / North America, Central / South America / Caribbean / Atlantic, Europe / Mediterranean, Middle East/Africa

Type (853/17 )

Anthropology, Bioanthropology, Classical Archaeology, Data Visualization (3D, Animation, etc), Ethnographic ...

Mediterranean - Cyprus - Expedition to Idalion - 2013

Deadline
2013-05-01
The city kingdom of Idalion flourished as the most prominent of the ten city kingdoms on Cyprus during the 6th and 7th centuries BCE. The site of Idalion has been continuously inhabited since the Iron Age; the village of Dhali sits in the same location today. The city was a center for the copper trade as well as the Cult of the Mother Goddess and her consort who later became Aphrodite and Adonis. Current excavations range from Iron Age to Roman occupation in three areas of the site.
Mediterranean - Cyprus - Human Remains Fieldschool In Cyprus (Forensic Anthropology & Bioarchaeology) - 2015

Mediterranean - Cyprus - Human Remains Fieldschool In Cyprus (Forensic Anthropology & Bioarchaeology) - 2015

Deadline
2015-06-05

An exciting and unique opportunity to learn field recording / excavation and lab analysis methods related to human skeletal remains.

The only fieldschool to offer access to modern skeletons (1970-2010) and the chance to work in the recycling process of an operating cemetery.

Mediterranean - Cyprus - Lycoming College Expedition to Idalion - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-01

Ancient Idalion was at its height in the Late Bronze and into the Iron Age of Near Eastern history; the town of Dhali is the modern descendant of the city kingdom. Students have the opportunity to be involved in excavation of primarily Iron Age through Roman Period levels with the Lycoming College Expedition to Idalion.

Mediterranean - Cyprus - The Prastio-Mesorotsos Archaeological Expedition - 2015

Deadline
2015-04-30

In the summer of 2015, a team of archaeologists, specialists and
students will conduct the fourth fieldwork season of the
Prastio-Mesorotsos Archaeological Expedition. Located inland, nestled in the Dhiarizos valley of western Cyprus, the site is a multi-period settlement spanning much of the island?s history, from the Neolithic through to the 1950s AD. The project will be run as a Field School, and no prior experience is required of participants. Students of any discipline are encouraged to apply, especially those from Archaeology, but also those interested in surveying, geography, ethnology, as well as anyone with an interest in Mediterranean history of any period.

Mediterranean - Cyprus - The Prastio-Mesorotsos Archaeological Expedition - 2016

Deadline
2016-06-30

In the summer of 2016, a team of archaeologists, specialists and students will conduct the fourth fieldwork season of the Prastio-Mesorotsos Archaeological Expedition. Located inland, nestled in the Dhiarizos valley of western Cyprus, the site is a multi-period settlement spanning much of the island’s history, from the Neolithic through to the 1950s AD. The project will be run as a Field School, and no prior experience is required of participants. In 2016 we will be concentrating on the prehistoric (Neolithic to Bronze Age) periods, and students of any discipline are encouraged to apply, especially those from Archaeology, but also those interested in surveying, geography, ethnology and classics as well as anyone with an interest in Mediterranean history of any period.

Mediterranean - Italy/Basilicata - Basentello Valley Archaeology Field School - 2012

Deadline
2012-03-01

Students are invited to participate in the Basentello Valley Archaeological Research Project in July and August of 2012. The project is a regional survey of the territory to the west of the Basentello River Valley in Basilicata, Italy, that seeks to identify regional settlement patterns and cultural change as a consequence of Roman administration and colonization. Students will learn the basics of archaeological survey, mapping, photography, artifact analysis, and environmental archaeology.

Mediterranean - Sicily - NIU Archaeological Field School in Sicily - 2011

Mediterranean - Sicily - NIU Archaeological Field School in Sicily - 2011

Deadline
2011-04-01

The primary goal of this program is to teach practical archaeological skills in a research environment. The field school is part of the Monte Polizzo Archaeological Project, a multinational Sicilian, Scandinavian, and American project focusing on the site of Monte Polizzo and the surrounding Belice Valley in the western-central portion of the Sicily. Monte Polizzo is a proto-urban hill top site used for nearly 1200 years and encompasses the Bronze, Early Iron, Elymian, and Hellenistic periods in the island's history. The surrounding valley settlement system is filled with additional Neolithic, Hellenistic and Roman sites. The valley's long occupation period, coupled with the diversity of archaeological cultures present in the area, make it an ideal training ground in archaeological methodology and provide ample evidence for introducing participants to the fascinating aspects of both classical and prehistoric archaeology. This field school is undertaken in conjunction with the universities of Gothenburg, Oslo, Palermo, and Stanford.

Menorca (Balearic Islands) - Spain- Archaeologic Field School Torre de'n Galmés -  2014

Menorca (Balearic Islands) - Spain- Archaeologic Field School Torre de'n Galmés - 2014

Deadline

Interesting and enjoying experience in an extraordinary mediterranean island.

The prehistory and history of Menorca is really intense. So diferent cultures've influenced the island. For this reason, their culture and style of life is specialy interesting to know.

We're glad to attend every summer lots of studends and share with them knowledge and experiences.

Menorca - Balearic Islands - Spain - Archeological Field Course Torre de'n Galmés - 2014

Menorca - Balearic Islands - Spain - Archeological Field Course Torre de'n Galmés - 2014

Deadline

Menorca is the northernmost island in the Balearic archipelago and is located
right in the middle of the western Mediterranean. Due to its small size, about 700 km2, and a very old orography, it's a fairly flat island. The highest elevation above sea level is the mountain of "El Toro" with its 356m.

However, the territory has been populated intensively since the arrival of humans on the island and its more than 1800 documented archaeological sites bear witness to several civilizations. The prehistoric settlement of Torre d'en Galmés, which is 6 hectares in size, is the most significant site on the island.
Precisely this site has hosted the Archaeological Field School that our
association has been conducting since 1991.

Our project involves excavation at the site of the talaiotic house known as the
"Cercle 7" and its surrounding area." It corresponds to a habitat structure
belonging to the Talaiotic culture of Menorca, with the regular layout of these prehistoric settlements: circular ground plan houses, the so-called circles because of their external appearance, with a south-facing façade and adjoining rooms (dormitories, fire hearths, storerooms) arranged around a central courtyard where most of the social and daily activities took place.

We have been excavating the front yard situated in front of the façade of the
"Cercle 7" house since 2011. Our aim is to document possible structures in the
abovementioned courtyard and to try to relate it to the differentiated areas in
the house.

Middle East - Egypt - Tell el-Amarna Geophysics Archaeological Project

Middle East - Egypt - Tell el-Amarna Geophysics Archaeological Project

Deadline
Use the latest in ground-based remote sensing technologies to reveal the secrets of the sacred city built by Pharaoh Akhenaton for the sun-god. Students will spend six weeks at Tell el-Amarna, Egypt, the once great capital city of Egypt located halfway between Cairo and Luxor. Students will explore the well-preserved ruins of this great city and receive hands-on experience using non-invasive archaeological techniques including surface survey and near-surface geophysical prospection. Work will concentrate on the North City, where they will map buried archaeological features using magnetometry and ground-penetrating radar.

Middle East - Egypt- Conservation Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-06-21

The vast Muslim cemeteries of Cairo – sometimes called the "City of the Dead" – are a unique urban environment that includes valuable medieval architectural monuments and living communities that practice traditional crafts. As part of the conservation and reconstruction efforts of the hawd mosque – erected by Sultan Qaitbey ca. 1,472 CE – students will participate in the documentation of physical and social aspects of a section of this quarter. Working side-by-side with Egyptian peers, students will learn about the architectural and urban history of a traditional Middle Eastern city, and about principles of architectural conservation and adaptive reuse. This field school is ideal for students seeking insights/career in urban planning, architecture, heritage conservation and archaeological preservation.

Middle East - Egypt- Fayum Field School- 2014

Deadline
2014-10-02

The Fayum field school takes place at the Greco-Roman town of Karanis, a large mud brick settlement founded in the third century BCE as part of the Ptolemaic expanse of agriculture in the Fayum region of Egypt. Karanis was abandoned during the early seventh century CE and the preservation of the ancient remains is excellent and a wide range of archaeological materials, including botanical macro-remains, textiles, wood and metal, are studied by a large group of archaeological specialists. This project focuses on both domestic and industrial areas of the site to better understand the importance of agriculture in relation to other economic activities. The 2014 field school will excavate at domestic contexts in order to augment our knowledge of the archaeobotanical and zooarchaeological record at the household level. The Fayum Field School combines teaching American students with training Egyptian archaeologists employed by the Ministry of State of Antiquities, which makes cultural exchange an integral part of the program. During the five weeks of the field school students get an intensive on-the-job training in archaeological research methods, excavation techniques, survey and finds processing. Students will have the opportunity to work closely with archaeological specialists and are encouraged to develop independent research projects. Excursions to important sites in the vicinity and ethnoarchaeological assignments are also part of this program.

Middle East - Israel -  Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project

Middle East - Israel - Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project

Deadline
Tel Bet Yerah (Khirbet Kerak) is a large mound dramatically situated on the Sea of Galilee at the outlet of the River Jordan, in Israel. Occupied throughout the Early Bronze Age (3500 – 2300 BCE) and sporadically in later times, Bet Yerah is the type site for Khirbet Kerak Ware, a unique ceramic industry created by EBA migrants with roots in Transcaucasia. In 2010 we will continue to investigate the monumental ‘Circles Building’(granary?) in its urban context, excavating nearby paved streets and domestic complexes dating to the EB III (about 2700 BCE). We will also renew excavations in the recently identified Umayyad palace of the 7th – 8th centuries CE. (http://www.tau.ac.il/humanities/archaeology/projects/betyerah). The archaeological Field School will be held in conjunction with the Archaeological Geophysics Field School at Tel Bet Yerah.

Middle East - Israel - Central Timna Valley Project CTV - 2015

Deadline
2015-01-25

The third field season of the Tel Aviv University Central Timna Valley Project (CTV) is coming soon (February 2015) and we welcome students and volunteers to join us. The excavations focus on Late Bronze and Iron Age mining and smelting sites in Timna, one of the best preserved ancient copper mining districts world-wide. The season includes a field school that grants TAU academic credit.

Middle East - Israel - Marj Rabba Archaeological Field School - 2012

Deadline
2012-04-02

The enigmatic Chalcolithic period (c. 4500-3700 BC) in the southern Levant (Israel, Jordan, Palestine) was a time when new burial practices, ritual centers and expanding networks for the trade of gold, obsidian, copper and ivory attest to widespread, fundamental changes in these pre-biblical societies. The first copper metallurgy begins, primarily for status items rather than functional tools. Cemeteries separate from villages, some with rich funeral goods, underscore changes in rites practiced in order to cope with new perceptions about life and death. This new project is designed to lead a multi-disciplinary research team to the Galilee, Israel in order to investigate the dramatic change in the relationship of villages, ritual sites and cemeteries during this little known period.

Middle East - Israel - Saving the Stones - 2014

Middle East - Israel - Saving the Stones - 2014

Deadline
2014-05-15

Saving the Stones is a 16-22 week international practical training internship in the conservation of built cultural heritage and historic preservation for emerging professionals from interdisciplinary backgrounds. Through an immersive cultural heritage experience, you will have the opportunity to learn, work, and live in an historic city and embrace the many unique characteristics of Old Acre, and the ancient cites of the land of Israel. Saving the Stones will give you the foundation needed to begin a career in cultural heritage and conservation. The first 16 weeks provide the foundational conservation and historic preservation studies which include theoretical and practical documentation, and treatment planning through to field work and application. Afterwards, the optional 6 week practicum allows the student to apply the knowledge acquired by the foundation unit through apprenticeship, and thorough personal research is conducted. Submit your application by April 1st, 2014 to receive a $200.00 discount!

Middle East - Israel - Tel Bet Yerah Geophysics Archaeological Project

Middle East - Israel - Tel Bet Yerah Geophysics Archaeological Project

Deadline
This field school will introduce students to archaeogeophysical methods, which allow us to “see” archaeological features buried beneath the ground surface. Students will be given hands-on instruction in these methods in the context of the ongoing Tel Bet Yerah Research and Excavation Project (TBYREP). Dramatically situated on the southern shore of the Sea of Galilee, Israel, Tel Bet Yerah is the site of a large fortified Early Bronze Age town. In 2010 we will explore a large expanse of the site where virtually nothing is known about the subsurface, and image areas where monumental structures and waterworks may be located. The Archaeological Geophysics Field School will be held in conjunction with the Archaeological Field School at Tel Bet Yerah.

Middle East - Israel - Tel Beth Shemesh Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-22

Tel Beth Shemesh was active during the Late Bronze and Iron Ages and was located at the geographic meeting point of three different ethnic and cultural groups, Philistines, Canaanites and Israelites. It is therefore an ideal site to investigate ancient geopolitical, social, and cultural dynamics at a border zone.This summer our excavation team will concentrate in the northern area of the site in order to explore cultural diversity, continuity, and changes from Level 4 (10th Century BCE) down to Level 9 (13th Century BCE). We began to reach the top of the Late Bronze Age destruction layer at the end of last season (2015) so this year will be especially exciting. Within and under this 13th Century BCE destruction layer we expect to find fired mudbricks, complete ceramic vessels, some of which will likely contain charred plant remains, and many artifacts still preserved in their primary context. We will be excavating in an area of the site where we discovered a very large palace from the el-Amarna Period (14th Century BCE), which may have been the seat of a (female!) monarch who ruled the walled Canaanite city and its environs.

Middle East - Israel - Tel Dor Archaeological Excavation and Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-02-28

From July 1 to August 8, the University of Washington Tel Dor Archaeological Program will resume its field school excavation at Dor under the director of Professor Sarah Stroup.

The UW Team will continue excavating, under the instruction of prof. Stroup (assisted by Israeli grad students fluent in English), the impressive and archaeologically-rich Hellenistic and Persian period buildings on the south side of the Tel ('Area D4'). This area, which we have been excavating since 2005, consists of a fascinating complex of large public buildings likely connected with Dor's focus as a center of coastal Mediterranean trade and industry.

Middle East - Israel - Tel Dor, Field School: Hebrew U. Rothberg International School or Haifa University

Middle East - Israel - Tel Dor, Field School: Hebrew U. Rothberg International School or Haifa University

Deadline
2010-05-01

An important site with natural harbors on the north and south sides of the site(today beautiful, white sand, swimming beaches), Dor preserves a continuous sequence from the Bronze Age through the Late Roman period. City fortifications plus residential, industrial, and public buildings including temples allow us to reconstruct life in the town for each period. Monday through Friday we dig in the morning, and Monday through Thursday we continue the day with processing and analysis of pottery and bone with experts in the afternoon followed by presentations delivered by excavation staff and affiliated archaeologists and scientists.

Middle East - Israel - The Jezreel Valley Regional Project: Tel Megiddo East - 2012

Deadline
2012-05-01

Join us for the excavation of the city of the Great Temple builders!

Centuries before the pyramids of Egypt rose along the Nile, the inhabitants of Megiddo organized themselves into a massive city and began construction on a monumental home for their revered god. This temple would be one of the most ambitious construction projects in the Levant, and the city responsible for it would be the earliest and largest urban formation for hundreds of miles.

This 5,000-year-old temple has now been revealed through excavations at Tel Megiddo. The temple complex consists of an artificial platform supported by a 4m-wide stone wall. This platform elevates the largest single edifice of the period in the entire Levant, the “Great Temple.” This massive broad-room temple is some 50 meters wide and more than 30 meters long. The structure features 3.5-meter-thick walls enclosing hallways stacked high with the bone refuse from animal sacrifices. The sanctuary is stunningly appointed with twelve 1-ton basalt slabs carved into rectangular and circular shapes which appear to have been used as ritual tables. Perhaps most amazing is the perfection with which the temple was planned, engineered, and constructed. Its plan is meticulously laid out such that the thicknesses of walls and their distance from each other are exact in every dimension. This is strong evidence for the birth of the disciplines of architecture and engineering, intellectual pursuits supported by a well-organized government.

The magnificent temple is now well-known but the larger urban landscape, the home of its builders, has never been explored. Archaeological survey, 2010 excavations, and GPR survey by the JVRP indicated that a large and contemporaneous settlement lies across the modern highway from the remarkable remains of the Megiddo temple. It is the concentration of human resources in this city that led directly or indirectly to the extraordinary architectural florescence on the tel.

In 2011, the JVRP began full-scale excavations of the EB city revealing houses, grain storage facilities, and large terrace walls supporting major structures contemporary with the Great Temple. This season, the JVRP will continue its exploration of the city of the Great Temple Builders, focusing on several new areas that have never been investigated before!

Middle East - Israel - The Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project - 2012

Middle East - Israel - The Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project - 2012

Deadline
2012-06-01

Tel Bet Yerah (Khirbet Kerak) is a large mound at the outlet of the River Jordan, Israel.Occupied throughout the Early Bronze Age, students will excavate a granary, plaza and houses.

Middle East - Israel - The Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project, Israel - 2015

Middle East - Israel - The Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project, Israel - 2015

Deadline
2015-06-06
Tel Bet Yerah (Khirbet Kerak) is a large mound situated on the Sea of Galilee, at the outlet of the River Jordan in Israel. Occupied throughout the Early Bronze Age and sporadically in later times, Bet Yerah was a fortified city at the beginning of the third millennium B.C.E.. It had contact with the First Dynasty kings of Egypt and was later home to a unique ceramic tradition: Khirbet Kerak Ware, with roots in the South Caucasus. In 2015 we will delve down into the deepest levels of the mound, in order to gain a better understanding of the creation of local cultural traditions at the beginning of the Early Bronze Age (3500 – 3100 BCE). In a nearby excavation area we will extend the exposure of remains that we attribute to the migrant community (the ‘Khirbet Kerak people’), with the intention of improving our understanding of the strategies they used to maintain their separate identity in a strange land at about 2,800 BCE and finding more evidence that will point to their precise place of origin.
Middle East - Israel - The University of Haifa 2010 Fieldschool in Archaeology at Tel Dor

Middle East - Israel - The University of Haifa 2010 Fieldschool in Archaeology at Tel Dor

Deadline
2010-05-15
Enjoy the Thrill of Discovery and help us unravel the secrets of Tel Dor, Israel under the Sea People, Phoenicians, Israelites and the Hellenistic and Roman Empires. Excavate with us in our 2010 (30th!) excavation season, July 6 - August 12 and earn academic credits.

Middle East - Israel - Training Program in Practical Conservation - 2016

Deadline
2015-12-20

Saving The Stones is a practical training program designed to give the foundation needed to begin a career in conservation of built heritage and historic preservation.
Through hands-on experiences on various archaeological and historical heritage sites in Israel, participants have a unique opportunity to learn, work, and live and embrace the diversity of famous historical sites in the Land of Israel.

Middle East - Israel - UW Tel Dor Archaeological Excavation and Field School

Deadline
2010-03-15

The Tel Dor Field School at the University of Washington is a one-of-a-kind program that instructs its students in modern archaeological technique, brings these students into the field as valued members of an international archaeological team, and provides an experience that will last a lifetime. Participants in the field school, working and studying daily with students and scholars from Israel and around the world, are moved from the role of student to that of archaeologist and fellow researcher. Each day on the Tel we uncover the past, learn more about the present, and add forever to our knowledge of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Come dig with us!

Middle East - Israel - UW Tel Dor Archaeological Excavations and Field School - 2011

Deadline
2011-03-15

The UW Tel Dor Field School 2011: From June 28 to August 8, 2011, the University of Washington Tel Dor Archaeological Program will resume its field school excavation at Dor under the director of Professor Sarah Culpepper Stroup. Come Dig with Us, Come Learn with Us, Come Explore with Us!

Middle East - Israel- Beth Shemesh Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-06-01

Since the beginning of modern explorations of the ancient Near East, Tel Beth Shemesh attracted great interest. Its long sequence of occupational history has yielded significant data about local cultural histories, trade and the evolution of local agricultural practices. During the Late Bronze and Iron Ages, Tel Beth-Shemesh was located at the geographic meeting point of three different ethnic and cultural groups (Philistines, Canaanites and Israelites), making it an ideal site to investigate ancient geopolitical, social, and cultural dynamics at a border zone. The main objective of this field school is to expose students to the archaeological process, from excavation to analysis, and the importance of rigorous yet adaptable excavation and recording techniques. Through hands-on learning, students gain experience in excavating and field documentation. They will also be introduced to the intellectual challenges presented by archaeological research, including the need to adjust field strategies as discoveries are made and theories change. Furthermore, students receive training in laboratory analysis and have the opportunity to process and catalogue the cultural remains they find.

Middle East - Jordan - Dhiban Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-22

Students will excavate in one ofJordan's most important historical sites. The Dhiban Excavation and Development Project has been working to understand the rich and complex archaeological record and preserve and develop this record as an economic and heritage resource for the future.

Middle East - Jordan - Edom Lowlands Regional Archaeology Project

Deadline
2011-06-03

The key focus of the UC San Diego Edom Lowlands Regional Archaeology Project (ELRAP) is a deep-time study of the role of mining and metallurgy on cultural evolution. ELRAP is unique because of our focus on developing and using a high-tech, on-site digital archaeology system, which allows students to master a wide array of digital survey and recording tools.

The 2011 season will primarily be devoted to exploring the social and political evolution of the Iron Age kingdom of Edom. The focus will be on landscape archaeology, and will include both cutting-edge noninvasive survey techniques and test soundings. Students will have the opportunity to participate in ELRAP surveys dedicated to investigating Early Bronze Age, Iron Age, Nabataean period and Islamic period settlement in Faynan.

Middle East - Jordan - Petra Field School - 2015

Deadline

This field school will allow students to join excavations in the ruins of ancient Petra in the Petra Garden and Pool Complex (PGPC). In antiquity, Petra was the hub of a vibrant trading network linking Arabia and the Mediterranean world, and the capital of the Nabataean kingdom that flourished from the 2nd century BCE through the 1st century CE. Recent excavations of the PGPC have revealed the remains of a monumental pool with island-pavilion, a complex water system of channels and pipelines, and pathways lain out across an expansive garden terrace. In 2015, students will focus on excavations of this unique system to gather evidence to pinpoint the date of its decline and for the pool’s water source. Students will also learn the methods of garden archaeology to analyze the garden.

Middle East - Jordan- Shubayqa Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-07-17

The Shubayqa Archaeological Project investigates the transition from hunting & gathering to agriculture in the Harra desert of Jordan. In particular, this project investigates the relationship between the Younger Dryas – a global climatic event that led to cooler temperatures and decreased rainfall – and the beginning of agriculture. The project area is the remote, rugged Shubayqa basin, a 12 km2 playa situated c. 130 km northeast of the Jordanian capital Amman. In 2014 the project will continue its excavations at the late Natufian site of Shubayqa 1, while also launching excavations at the early Neolithic site Shubayqa 6 nearby. Furthermore, we will continue with our landscape survey of the surrounding area to discover additional sites, and carry out geoarchaeological sampling across the Shubayqa basin to study past environmental conditions. In addition, we will be processing and analyzing finds, and conducting some ethnographic fieldwork to better understand the use of the Badia by modern-day Bedouin pastoralists.

Middle East - Oman - Bat Field School - 2014

Deadline
2015-01-02

The UNESCO World Heritage site of Bat, al-Khutm, and al-Ayn in northern Oman was once a major Bronze Age center of ancient “Magan” from 3,000 to 2,000 BCE, with connections to Mesopotamia, Iran, and the Indus Civilization. Unfortunately, the people of Magan did not use writing or glyptic arts to record their history or organize their societies, so we know very little about their way of life. Since 2007, the Bat Archaeological Project (BAP) has been exploring the well preserved 3rd millennium BCE remains at this site, combining GIS-assisted surveys with stratigraphic excavations, radiocarbon dating, and other specialized methodologies – including geomorphology, archaeobotany and geophysical prospection – in order to better understand the social history of this region. During the 2014 season, we will explore a new area of domestic structures, looking at the transition from an early agricultural town of the Hafit Period (ca. 3,100-2,700 BCE) to a developed Umm an-Nar center of trade and production.

Middle East - Tunisia- Zita Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-08-01

The site of Zita is an urban mound located in southern Tunisia and situated along an ancient trade route from Carthage to Tripoli. Identified by a Latin inscription as the Roman city of “Zita” (“Olive City” in Punic) it also contains a Carthaginian child sacrifice precinct (tophet). Our project is the first modern research expedition to be granted permission to work here. This is a lab based field school - this means that we will not be excavating. We will, however, be engaging in several technical and analytical projects that provide a rare opportunity for student participation. In addition to 1) analysis using portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (pXRF) of environmental soil and industrial artifacts and 2) the bioarchaeological recovery of sacrificial remains both described in the next paragraphs, students will engage in 3) ceramic drawing, and 4) experimental archaeology and ethnoarchaeology of traditional olive charcoal production, perhaps also traditional plaster production, and if there is a harvest, traditional olive collection and processing. The work will be conducted in the storage facilities of the Zarzis Museum, on site, and in the villa where we live.

Middle East - Turkey - Buncuklu Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-22

The Boncuklu project is investigating the appearance of the first villages and farmers in central Turkey. At Boncuklu we are also exploring the origins of the remarkable symbolism seen in paintings and reliefs at the nearby famous Neolithic town of Çatalhöyük.

Middle East – Egypt - Giza Archaeological Field Training - 2014

Deadline
2014-05-31

Archaeological field training at the Giza plateau, Egypt, offered by Ancient Egypt Research Associates (AERA) and the American University in Cairo (AUC). The eight-week field training program takes place at the Heit el-Ghurab site, an Old Kingdom (2450 BC) pyramid builder’s settlement in Giza, as part of AERA’s muti-disciplinary archaeological project. The program provides eight academic credits awarded by AUC and will run from January 31 to March 26, 2015. The program includes six full-weeks excavation and one week’s work in the field laboratory. Site training covers excavation; site recording; survey; illustration and photography; and an introduction to bio-anthropology. In the lab and office: introduction to Archaeo-botany, Archaeo-zoology; Ceramics, Artefact, Lithics, Mud sealings, and GIS (Geographic Information Systems). The comprehensive package covers tuition, accommodation and on-site food, tool kit and supplies, medical insurance, local transportation, and special field trips to archaeological sites in Greater Cairo.

Middle East – Turkey – Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project - 2013

Deadline
2013-02-15

The Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project (ACARP) announces its third archaeological field school for the summer of 2013.  Antiochia ad Cragum is located on the south-central coast of Turkey in ancient Rough Cilicia.  The Project is currently excavating a third-century AD Imperial temple, a colonnaded street, and a major bath complex that includes a large mosaic.  In 2013, in addition to continued work on the Temple and Bath Complex, we plan to begin work on the city’s Agora or marketplace.

Middle East/Africa - Kenya - Koobi Fora Field School - 2013

Middle East/Africa - Kenya - Koobi Fora Field School - 2013

Deadline
2013-03-15

So you want to hunt for evidence of our earliest ancestors?... Welcome to Koobi Fora.

The National Museums of Kenya and George Washington University’s Center for the Advanced Study of Hominin Paleobiology have teamed up to provide you with a unique opportunity to explore some of the most remote parts of Africa and search for evidence of hominins in the most dramatic landscapes you will ever experience.

Apply to be a part of the Koobi Fora Field School, the premier paleoanthropology training experience. Our team of experts from all over the world have begun conducting exciting new field projects that you can be a part of. Field projects include:
- Studying fossilized footprints from 1.6 million years ago
- Finding evidence of human scavenging and hunting 2.0 million years ago
- Exploring evidence of climate change and animal communities over the last 4 million years
- Discovering the changes associated with the emergence of domesticated animals in East Africa

Our faculty include the foremost experts in hominin physiology, Paleolithic archaeology, landscape archaeology, zooarchaeology, bioarchaeology and many more.

Join us to be a part of the exciting new research. A life changing experience awaits you on the shores of Lake Turkana…

North America - Alaska - Subarctic Archaeology at Mead Site, Alaska (UAF) - 2016

Deadline
2016-05-04

Mead site is a multicomponent site consisting of at least 4 components dating from 14,000 to 1,400 years ago in deeply buried stratified contexts in the mid Tanana Basin, near Delta Junction, Alaska. This site has received little investigation given its importance in the early prehistory of northwest North America, but initial excavations have yielded lithic tools, organic tools, and faunal remains from multiple components. Along with Broken Mammoth and Swan Point, this is one of the oldest sites in northwest North America, and indeed in the Western Hemisphere. The presence of faunal remains and lithic artifacts within stratified contexts provides an opportunity to document patterning in site use and test hypotheses about technology, subsistence, and settlement of ancient populations in Interior Alaska. We will investigate an area where we recovered the earliest Art (decorated antler pendants) in northern North America.

The 2016 excavation and field school at Mead is designed to better understand activity areas and technological and subsistence change through time. Specifically, we will focus on areas of the site where we recovered numerous faunal remains (bison, waterfowl, small game, and fish) dating to ~12,500 cal BP, that may represent multiple ancient house floors.

North America  - Yukon - Field School in Subarctic Archaeology and Ethnography - 2012

North America - Yukon - Field School in Subarctic Archaeology and Ethnography - 2012

Deadline
2012-05-01
An introduction to archaeological and ethnographic field methods as currently practiced in Yukon—that is, as an integrated program of documentation of local culture-history with a strong community presence in the research activities. Principal excavations of 12000 to 14,000 years old Beringian deposits at the Little John site, archaeological survey around the Yukon - Alaska borderlands, and ethnographic work with the White River First Nation of Beaver Creek.

North America - New Mexico - Chaco Research Semester - 2013

Deadline
2013-08-01

Chaco research immersion course. Field session (5 weeks in Sept./Oct.) plus an advanced laboratory class and a topical seminar. Contact the Anthropology Dept. at the University of New Mexico for a detailed PDF flyer (ajls@unm.edu)

North America - Alabama - Fort Tombecbe - 2014

Deadline
2014-04-14
The 2014 University of West Alabama field school at colonial Fort Tombecbe is May 18-June 14. Excavations will focus on the French period (1736-1763) bakery, barracks and contemporaneous Choctaw materials. Students will become familiar with the tools of archaeology and methods of controlled excavation, pedestrian surveys, lab processing, and public interpretation. Specific skills to be covered include using a total station, profiling, soil description, recording archaeological data, and the particulars of excavating a historical, multi-ethnicity frontier site.
North America - Alabama - Fort Tombecbe Archaeological Project - 2012

North America - Alabama - Fort Tombecbe Archaeological Project - 2012

Deadline
2012-04-18
The 2012 University of West Alabama archaeological field school is May 21 – June 16 at the 18th century colonial French, British, and Spanish Fort Tombecbe site. The course (AN 401) emphasizes archaeolog
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ical excavation techniques, with a secondary focus on survey and mapping.
North America - Alaska - Adelphi Archaeology Field School - 2013

North America - Alaska - Adelphi Archaeology Field School - 2013

Deadline
2013-03-11
The Adelphi University Department of Anthropology will initiate summer 2013 archaeological field reconnaissance and site excavations at multiple sites in the Susitna River valley. In addition to participation in an ongoing research program, students will experience unspoiled Alaska wilderness, acquire important technological skills using state-of-the-art research technologies, and learn the fundamentals of archaeological excavation.
North America - Alaska - Adelphi in Alaska Field and Lab Techniques in Archaeology - 2013

North America - Alaska - Adelphi in Alaska Field and Lab Techniques in Archaeology - 2013

Deadline
2013-03-16
University students interested in archaeology or environmental science are encouraged to attend the Adelphi Archaeological Field School in Alaska. Experience pristine wilderness, participate in ongoing research, and make new discoveries. Research will focus on two prehistoric sites in the Susitna Valley including the 10,000-year-old occupation at Trapper Creek Overlook and a variety of other late-prehistoric complex hunter-gatherer sites. Undergraduate students can enroll in 4 credits and contribute to a multi-year research program. Learn archaeological methods involving 21st century field-based technologies including GPS, GIS, and total station. In addition to a true wilderness experience, students learn basic principles of site mapping, excavation, and soil formation as well as orienteering, survey, and cultural diversity. Enjoy “off the grid” camping and backpacking and explore the ancient past.
North America - Alaska - Advanced Archaeology Field School - 2015

North America - Alaska - Advanced Archaeology Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-03-25

Set in the Alaskan wilderness, students will join a research team to investigate prehistoric cultures, improve analytical abilities through the recovery and study of complex archeological evidence including geological soil formations and artifact spatial context. Gain hands on experience operating specialized equipment and learn to locate new sites through survey.

North America - Alaska - Archaeology Field School - 2015

North America - Alaska - Archaeology Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-03-25

Travel to Alaska to participate in an ongoing research program and experience unspoiled wilderness, acquire important technological skills using state-of-the-art research technologies, and learn the fundamentals of archaeological excavation. Students will acquire skills in archaeological excavation, survey, mapping, and orienteering as well as historic preservation and compliance regulations.

North America - Alaska - Archaeology Field School in Quinhagak, Alaska, Nunalleq Project - 2015

North America - Alaska - Archaeology Field School in Quinhagak, Alaska, Nunalleq Project - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-01

The University of Aberdeen Department of Archaeology and its partnering institutions are working in association with the Yup’ik Eskimo village of Quinhagak and Qanirtuuq, Inc. to save their archaeological heritage threatened by melting permafrost and rising levels of the Bering Sea.

North America - Alaska - Late Pleistocene Archaeology Field School in the Tanana Valley

Deadline

University students interested in archaeology or cultural resource management are encouraged to apply for the 2016 Adelphi in Alaska Archaeological Field School. With an instructor-to-student ratio among the lowest available, you will experience a vast wilderness, participate in ongoing research, and make new discoveries. Research will focus on the newly discovered Holzman site along Shaw Creek where large mammal bones, mammoth ivory fragments, and stone tools have been found dating back to the end of the last Ice Age. Join our research team in the scenic Tanana Valley as we investigate the question, who were the First Alaskans? Undergraduate students can enroll in 4 credits and contribute to a multi‐year research program. Learn archaeological methods involving 21st century field‐based technologies including GPS, GIS, and total station. In addition to a true wilderness experience, students learn basic principles of site mapping, excavation, and soil formation as well as orienteering, professional survey, and remote living. Enjoy Alaska camping and explore the ancient past!

North America - Arizona - Coconino CRM field school - 2016

Deadline
2016-06-30

The major objective of this field school is to prepare students for a career in cultural resource management (CRM) while conducting a typical small-scale CRM inventory and evaluation project. The field school will take place on the Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff, Arizona.

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