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Archaeology & Anthropology Field Schools

Europe - Cyprus - Experimental Archaeology & Beer Production - 2013

Archaeology Field School Location and Dates

Application Deadline
2013-05-31
Start Date 2013-07-31
End Date 2013-08-29

Multiple Sessions Yes
Multiple Session information

Field School 1 - 31st July to 14th August
Field School 2 - 16th to 29th August


Archaeology Field School Location

Kissonerga, Paphos Region, Cyprus





Archaeology Field School Travel
Flights to/from Cyprus are not included
Additional Information on Tution/Room and Board/Travel Costs

Meals on workdays and accommodation will be provided but it is recommended that you bring a minimum of £70 per week extra spending money.

Archaeology Field School Description


HARP will be running an Experimental Archaeology Field School in the village of Kissonerga, Cyprus in August 2013.

The Field School aims to recreate an installation that was likely used for beer production in the Middle Bronze Age. The original structure has been excavated as part of a research excavation run by Dr. Lindy Crewe of the University of Manchester since 2007.

The site of Kissonerga-Skalia is a Middle Bronze Age settlement that has revealed a series of domestic dwellings that were superseded by a phase of monumental construction. The village of Kissonerga is incredibly rich in archaeological sites with some of the worlds oldest Neolithic wells at Kissonerga-Mylouthkia, the Chalcolithic settlement of Kissonerga-Mosphillia, as well as the settlement of Skalia.

The original installation was constructed out of mud plaster and would have had a domed roof. The structure contained a series of pot lined pits and a sunken fire pit that would have heated the main chamber of the structure.

During beer production, partially germinated or malted grains are added to water and heated to make a 'mash' and wort, a sticky viscous liquid. Prior to making the 'mash', the germination process of the grains needs to be stopped, this is usually done by drying the grains rapidly. It is believed that the heat generated within the main chamber of the installation at Skalia would be sufficient to dry out the germinated grains before making the 'mash'. Following this stage the fermentation process can begin in order to produce beer.

In 2013 we are running two projects with slightly different goals, but both with the aim of improving our understanding of beer production and consumption in Bronze Age Cyprus.

Field School 1

The aims of the first Field School are to build a second installation using slightly different construction techniques than in 2012 and to produce beer using methods likely dating back to the Bronze Age. The 2012 kiln and the 2013 kiln will be used to dry malted grains before the grains are crushed using traditional techniques. The crushed malt will then be used to make beer using locally sourced ingredients and traditional brewing techniques.

Participants will learn and apply experimental archaeology building techniques in order to recreate a fully functional installation. Alongside this participants will also be provided with practical workshops that will teach them archaeological recording techniques, as well as visiting a number of local sites and seminars that will put their work into the context of the local archaeological record and the archaeology of Cyprus as a whole.

The Field School is ideal for all levels of archaeology students, particularly those with an interest in experimental archaeology or the archaeology of the Mediterranean and Near East, as well as anyone with an interest in the subject or looking to become more involved in learning about archaeology.

Field School 2

The aims of the second Field School are to further investigate the brewing process and ingredient sources in Bronze Age Cyprus. Different techniques will be employed to investigate all stages of the beer production process from the sourcing of ingredients, both wild and domesticated, to the germination of the grain, through to the mashing and fermentation processes. Techniques will be recreated using evidence from Kissonerga-Skalia as well as from a series of Bronze Age scenic compositions believed to be associated with feasting and beer production/consumption.

Participants will learn and apply experimental archaeology techniques in the processing of food crops and beer production using traditional techniques. Participants will be involved in creating a set of Bronze Age brewing equipment and using them to create a series of Bronze Age beers. There will also be a set of field trips used to investigate and source the ingredients used for beer production. Alongside this participants will also be provided with practical workshops that will teach them archaeological recording techniques, as well as visiting a number of local sites and seminars that will put their work into the context of the local archaeological record and the archaeology of Cyprus as a whole.

The Field School is ideal for all levels of archaeology students, particularly those with an interest in experimental archaeology or the archaeology of the Mediterranean and Near East, as well as beer enthusiasts and those wanting to learn more about prehistoric brewing techniques.

During the summer temperatures can reach up to 38 degrees and the climate is humid, so be prepared! We are however only a stones throw away from the Mediterranean, a great way to relax with a beer after a day in the sun, heat and mud!

Dates

Field School 1 will be running from Wednesday 31st July to Wednesday 14th August with participants arriving on the 31st and departing on the 14th.

Field School 2 will be running from Friday 16th August to Thursday 29th August with participants arriving on the 16th and departing on the 29th.

Archaeology Field School Additional Information

Archaeology Field School Type

Experimental Archaeology recreating a Bronze Age structure


Time Period

Bronze Age


Field School Setting/Conditions

Field schools will be set in a small village that has access to local amenities including supermarket, tavernas etc. There are also buses that go into the city of Paphos which is only 6km away.


How is the project area accessed each day

Tarnsport to and from site will be provided for both field schools and for any field trips (the site for field school 1 is only a short 5 minute walk from the accommodation)


What is the daily schedule for the field school

Both field schools will operate 5 working days out of 7. Exact work days will be confirmed dependant on local holiday conditions. Working hours will generally be from 06:30 until 13:30 to avoid the worst of the heat. Some light work or field trips will be carried out on some of the afternoons


Number of years this Archaeology Field School has been in operation
Second Year
Is there a professional certification for this field school

N/A


Directors and Instructors

Ian Hill, Director of HARP


Specialized skills you will have the opportunity to learn

- Experimental building techniques
- Ancient brewing practices
- Technical drawing including planning and section drawing
- Standing building survey
- Archaeological photography


On rain days will there be lab work?

N/A


Will there be additional organized activities?

There will be field trips to other sites within the area to put the work into context


Will there be additional organized activities?

N/A


Is travel restriced during free time?

N/A



Other resources students will find useful

http://www.harparchaeology.co.uk/field-schools/experimental-archaeology-beer-production-1

Archaeology Field School Contact Information and Website

Field School Website: http://www.harparchaeology.co.uk/field-schools/experimental-archaeology-beer-production-1

Field School Contact Information



Ian Hill
Heritage & Archaeological Research Practice
152 Morrison Street
Edinburgh
EH3 8EB
UK



Field School Contact E-mail:
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Field School Contact Website: http://www.harparchaeology.co.uk


  
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