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Archaeology & Anthropology Field Schools

Europe - Italy- Pran’e Siddi Field School - 2016

Europe - Italy- Pran’e Siddi Field School - 2016

Archaeology Field School Location and Dates

Application Deadline
2016-04-22
Start Date 2016-07-10
End Date 2016-08-13



Archaeology Field School Location

Italy- Sardinia- Pran’e Siddi

Archaeology Field School Tuition and Credits

Sponsoring College/Institution

Institute for Field Research


Academic Credit

Attending students will be awarded 8 semester credit units (equivalent to 12 quarter units) through our academic partner, University California Los Angeles.


Archaeology Field School Tuition

$ 4,600


Archaeology Field School Room and Board

Included in tuition



Additional Information on Tution/Room and Board/Travel Costs

Tuition includes registration, accommodations, program activities, meals on workdays, and health insurance. Airfare, weekend meals and optional excursions are additional.

Archaeology Field School Description


Pran'e Siddi, or the Siddi Plateau, is a high basaltic plateau located in south-central island of Sardinia (Italy), near the modern town of Siddi. The area around Siddi was inhabited by prehistoric villagers beginning in the Neolithic period (ca. 4,000-3,200 BCE). However, during the Middle Bronze Age (ca. 1,700-1,450 BCE), these previously egalitarian people began to develop a hierarchical social system with an elite who expressed their power and prestige through the building of monumental stone towers called nuraghi. The change in social organization that happened at the Siddi Plateau happened at roughly the same time throughout the island of Sardinia, resulting in the unique, tower-building Nuragic culture. The elites of the early Nuragic (1,700-1,450 BCE) community on and around the Siddi Plateau built sixteen nuraghi and a monumental tomb, which they lived in and added onto for three centuries. By 1450 BCE, however, the elite sites on the Siddi Plateau were abandoned and the population moved away. Previous archaeological work in the area suggested that the Nuragic elites may have been using unsustainable agricultural practices to gain wealth and support their power. Over time, this unsustainable use of the landscape would have led to a decrease in soil productivity and may have forced the Nuragic people to relocate. The Pran'e Siddi Landscape Project was formed to conduct a more thorough investigation of agricultural practices and environmental change around the Siddi Plateau during the Nuragic period. The Project will use archaeological survey, soil studies, and artifact analysis to reconstruct changing patterns of land use and look for evidence of environmental depletion. Pran'e Siddi, or the Siddi Plateau, is a high basaltic plateau located in south-central island of Sardinia. The area around Siddi was inhabited by prehistoric villagers beginning in the Neolithic period (ca. 4,000-3,200 BCE). During the Middle Bronze Age (ca. 1,700-1,450 BCE), the previously egalitarian people began to develop a hierarchical social system with an elite who expressed their power and prestige through the building of monumental stone towers called nuraghi. By 1450 BCE, however, the elite sites on the Siddi Plateau were abandoned and the population moved away. Previous archaeological work in the area suggested that the Nuragic elites may have been using unsustainable agricultural practices to gain wealth and support their power. In 2016 we will dig deeper into what kind of pressures – social, environmental, and/or economic – could have made the Nuragic people abandon their towers on the plateau. Many of the questions we are trying to answer can be addressed through careful analysis of the remains the Nuragic people left behind, including pottery, animal bones, and bone, stone, and ceramic tools. During the Pran’e Siddi Landscape Project Laboratory Experience, students will contribute to ongoing research by analyzing animal bones, pottery, artifacts, and sediments recovered from the region in previous years.

Archaeology Field School Additional Information


Time Period

Nuragic culture, Bronze Age


Field School Setting/Conditions

Archaeological field work involves physical work in the outdoors. You should be aware that conditions in the field are different than those you experience in your home, dorms or college town. This program operates in a typical Mediterranean environment. During the day, temperatures can reach 80o‐90oF. Humidity is relatively low, but some mosquitoes and flies are present in the excavation area. Ticks are also occasionally present, and students are encouraged to wear long pants at the dig site. If you have medical concerns, please discuss with your doctor. For other concerns, please discuss with the project director – as appropriate.






Directors and Instructors

Dr. Emily Holt, State University of New York at Buffalo (emilyhol@buffalo.edu)








Archaeology Field School Contact Information and Website

Field School Website: http://ifrglobal.org/programs/europe/italy-prace-siddi-2016

Field School Contact Information



Call us toll free at +1 (877) 839-4374
Institute for Field Research office address:
2999 Overland Ave. #103, Los Angeles, CA 90064



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Field School Contact Website: http://www.ifrglobal.org


  
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