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Archaeology & Anthropology Field Schools

Asia Pacific - Australia - Australian Rock Art Field School - 2013

Deadline

This field school provides the rare opportunity for students to record and understand rock art at iconic Australian archaeological sites in the Mid Murray and Riverland region of South Australia.

Australia - Australian Archaeology and Wildlife Internships and Field Schools - 2014

Australia - Australian Archaeology and Wildlife Internships and Field Schools - 2014

Deadline
2013-12-05

Gain practical skills while working with the Traditional Owners and specialists amid the stunning natural and cultural landscapes of southern Western Australia. An integrated team will undertake an expedition to the amazing rock art complex of Marbaleerup (Mount Ridley), north of the town of Esperance. This culturally significant region contains amazing rock art, incredible stone arrangements, extensive stone artifact scatters, ancient waterholes and lonely graves. From here, the team heads to the coast (Cape Arid National Park) to study and record several cultural places. The Gabbie Kyle team are also working with wildlife specialists to monitor endangered fauna of the region. Working under the guidance of Traditional Owners, participants will gain practical skills in archaeological field methods, heritage management, cultural mapping, and environmental science.

Australia - Ethnoarchaeology in Aboriginal Australia Field School

Deadline
This topic will teach students how to undertake ethical and culturally sensitive ethnoarchaeological research. Activities may include rock art recording, site recording, artefact recording, collecting oral histories, and ethical interactions with Indigenous groups.

Australia - Northern Territory - Ethnoarchaeology Field School - 2015

Deadline

This field school provides a unique opportunity for students to undertake 'community' archaeology in Australia. Students will have the chance to learn field-based archaeological skills, while at the same time developing other practical and personal skills necessary to conduct archaeological research with Aboriginal communities.

Europe - Italy - Valcamonica Rock Art & Archaeology Field School - 2011

Deadline
2011-06-20
The Footsteps of Man Archaeological Cooperative Society in association with the Catholic University of Brescia organizes its annual archaeology field school at Paspardo, one of the major area with engravings concentration in Valcamonica, giving the opportunity to archaeologists and scholars, students and enthusiasts to help the research and to learn how to study the rock art. The project participants will: survey, excavate, clean, photograph, draw and catalogue the rocks engraved in five main sites at Paspardo, Valcamonica: Vite-Deria, Baite Fles, In Valle, La Bosca and Dos Sulif.

Europe - Italy - Valcamonica Rock Art Field School and Fieldwork - 2016

Deadline
2016-07-14

Footsteps of Man and the Catholic University of Brescia organise  annual archaeology fieldwork at Paspardo, one of the major concentrations of engravings in the Alps, giving those interested (archaeologists and scholars, students and enthusiasts) the opportunity to help the research and learn how to study rock art at Valcamonica. Project participants will: survey, excavate, clean, photograph, draw and catalogue the rocks engraved in three main sites at Paspardo, Valcamonica: Vite-Deria, La Bosca, Castello. The project consists of different phases: survey to find new engraved rocks; analysis of the level of damage to the rock surfaces and conservation problems; contact tracing to record the engravings using permanent pens on plastic sheets and photography; reduction of drawing to scale; cataloguing of engravings. Training will be given. Participants will also take part to lectures given by scholars of international fame, visits to rock art sites and museums.

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch - 2012

Deadline
2012-03-17
The University of Arizona School of Anthropology will conduct its second field season at Rock Art Ranch for undergraduate and graduate students at all skill levels. Participants will learn survey, lab, and excavation techniques. The ranch contains some of the Southwest’s most spectacular rock art dating from 6000 BCE to 1300 CE. Project goals are to gain an understanding of how the landscape was used by groups over the past 8000 years, how and why groups migrated to and from the area, and what role the rock art played in communicating identity and ownership.

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch - 2015

Deadline
2015-03-13

The University of Arizona School of Anthropology will be conducting its fifth field season at Rock Art Ranch during the first summer session of 2015 (June 1 through July 4) for undergraduate and graduate students at all skill levels. The participants will learn both archaeological survey and excavation techniques. For survey, participants will learn site identification, location and mapping using GPS and total station; artifact identification, collection and processing; soil and plant identification; and artifact analysis and sourcing. For excavation, the participants will learn site and feature identification, the principles of stratigraphy and their application to the archaeological record, seriation techniques, artifact identification and typology, and basic laboratory procedures. Finally, students will be shown how by combining the techniques of survey and excavation, a more complete understanding of human society in the past can be achieved.

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool - 2014

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-14

Rock Art Ranch is a private ranch 25 miles southeast of Winslow, AZ. The ranch contains some of the Southwest’s most spectacular rock art dating from 6000 BC to AD 1300. The ranch lies in the high desert at 5100’ elevation, in an area used over the past 8000 years by mobile hunting and gathering groups, early farmers, and later, after A.D. 500, by more sedentary farmers representing archaeological cultures of the adjacent Mogollon Rim and Colorado Plateau regions. For 2014, the goals are to document how the landscape was used by groups over the past 8000 years, how and why groups migrated to and from the area, and what role the rock art played in communicating identity and ownership. Excavations have already helped develop a tighter chronology for the area and provided details on length of site occupation and subsistence base. Survey by fieldschool participants have located 95 new sites in three summers that cluster in three time periods: Basketmaker II (early agricultural), 1000 BCE-500 CE; Basketmaker III/Pueblo I, 600-900 CE; and Pueblo III, 1100-1250 CE. It is the BMII groups who carved most of the petroglyphs.

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool REU - 2014

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool REU - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-14

Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, has received an NSF-REU (National Science Foundation Research Enrichment for Undergraduate students) grant for 2014-2016 to provide five weeks of hands-on experience in doing field archaeology followed by two weeks of training in four research labs at ASM on the UA campus for eligible undergraduate students. Students accepted into this program for 2014 will be paid $500/week for seven weeks and have their travel and basic living expenses paid as well.
The purpose of the program is to use archaeology as a vehicle to expose underserved students to how science is used to explore and understand the world around them. Equally as important is to expose students to potential career opportunities and to provide them with much needed experience to make them more competitive in the work place.

North America - Arizona - University of Arizona Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool - 2016

Deadline
2016-03-18

The University of Arizona School of Anthropology’s Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool will conduct its sixth summer of fieldwork from June 6 to July 9, 2016. The fieldschool is for undergraduate and graduate students at all skill levels. The participants will learn both archaeological survey and excavation techniques. For survey, participants will learn site identification, location and mapping using GPS and a total station; artifact identification, collection and processing; soil and plant identification; and artifact analysis and sourcing. For excavation, the participants will learn mapping at all levels of the site, feature identification, the principles of stratigraphy and their application to the archaeological record, seriation techniques, artifact identification and typology, and basic laboratory procedures. Finally, students will be shown how by combining the techniques of survey and excavation, a more complete understanding of human society in the past can be achieved.

North America - California - Wind Wolves Preserve Archaeological Field School - 2012

North America - California - Wind Wolves Preserve Archaeological Field School - 2012

Deadline
2012-07-01
Located in the heart of interior South-Central California, the Wind Wolves Preserve lies at the interface between several rich habitats and contains some of the most spectacular examples of Native American paintings found anywhere in North America.Students will investigate rock-art, habitation and special purpose sites.

North America - Montana - Blacktail Ranch Field School - 2012

Deadline
2012-06-30
2012 will be the forth year for the Blacktail field school. This year we will be working in a pristine Buffalo jump used by the Plains Indians. 2011 dates come in at 3,500 years BP. This season we are hoping to uncover site much older. We will also be offering Rock Are Recording and surveying and mapping sites on the Blacktail Ranch. Basic Archeological skills of survey, mapping, excavating and recording will be taught.
North America - Texas - SHUMLA Field Methods in Rock Art at Comstock, Texas - 2012

North America - Texas - SHUMLA Field Methods in Rock Art at Comstock, Texas - 2012

Deadline
2012-05-14

This course will examine rock art as an integral component of the archeological record. Students will be trained in field methods to record rock art and will gain first-hand experience recording rock art sites through photography, field sketches, mapping, and written inventories. These field methods are designed to generate a visual and written description of the art, which can be used to infer and explain past human behavior.

North America - Texas- Lower Pecos Canyonlands Archaeological Field School - 2013

North America - Texas- Lower Pecos Canyonlands Archaeological Field School - 2013

Deadline
2013-03-15

The 2013 Archaeological Field School will be based at the SHUMLA School, which is located 50 miles
west of Del Rio, Texas, within the Lower Pecos Canyonlands. The Lower Pecos contains hundreds of rock
shelters, most of which contain archaeological deposits and many of which contain some of the finest
examples of prehistoric rock art in the world, dating to over 4,000 years old. No other region in the
Americas is known to contain so many well‐preserved hunter‐gatherer sites in such a small area.

North America - Utah - University of Utah Archaeological Summre Field School - 2013

Deadline
2013-03-01

The University of Utah's summer program in archaeological field techniques will be held at Range Creek Canyon in east central Utah. Jointly sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and the Natural History Museum of Utah, this course offers students the opportunity to learn modern archaeological field and lab techniques in an ongoing field research program. Under the direction of Dr. Duncan Metcalfe, participants in the program will also receive training in archaeological method and theory.

South America - Peru - Huari - Ancash Archaeological Research Project Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-29

The aim of this archaeology and bioarchaeology field school is to learn of the lifestyle of the prehispanic population in Peru Highlands. Our project revolves around funeral aspects and ancestral cults. We are undertaking archaeological excavations in order to obtain information which helps us understand these subjects.The project is supported by Instituto de Estudios Huarinos under direction of Bebel Ibarra Asencios, Researcher of Department of Anthropology. Tulane University.

US - California - Wind Wolves Reserve - Connecting Rock-Art and Environment

US - California - Wind Wolves Reserve - Connecting Rock-Art and Environment

Deadline
Located in the heart of interior South-Central California, the Wind Wolves Reserve lies at the interface between several rich habitats and contains some of the most spectacular examples of Native American paintings found anywhere in North America. This project allows students to directly investigate a series of sites that link rock-art to society within particular environmental surroundings. Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to utilize cutting edge laser equipment in scanning and mapping. This project truly is redefining not only the archaeology of an under-explored interior Californian landscape, but is advancing the global study of rock-art by linking it to the environment in an unprecedented excavation and cutting edge digital documentation approach.
US - Texas - Field Methods in Rock Art

US - Texas - Field Methods in Rock Art

Deadline
2010-03-31

Earn three to six hours of undergraduate or three hours of graduate credit through Texas State University while studying rock art that has been described by Dr. Jean Clottes as "...second to none and ranks among the top bodies of rock art anywhere in the world."

Taught by Dr. Carolyn E. Boyd, author of Rock Art of the Lower Pecos, and Elton R. Prewitt, respected Texas archeologist, this three-week course provides hands-on training in rock art and recording techniques and many other aspects of archeological field work.

Please contact Angel Johnson at programs@shumla.org for more info, or visit our website: www.shumla.org

You will be studying in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of Texas, an area that has been recognized by world rock-art experts as containing some of the most spectacular imagery in the world.

US - Texas - Field Methods in Rock Art - 2011

Deadline
2011-04-15

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Field methods are the underpinning of the science of archeology. Rock art has posed a unique challenge to the field archeologist because, unlike other artifacts, it cannot be excavated, labeled, bagged, and transported back to the lab for analysis. This course will examine rock art as an integral component of the archeological record. Students will be trained in field methods to record rock art and will gain first-hand experience recording rock art sites through photography, field sketches, mapping, and written inventories. These field methods are designed to generate a visual and written description of the art, which can be used to infer and explain past human behavior.

Lectures will expose students to methods of interpretation and analysis and to the theoretical underpinnings of cognitive archeology. Lectures will be provided by the course instructor and by archeologists and anthropologists specializing in the archeology of the Lower Pecos, hunting and gathering lifeways, expressive culture, and foraging adaptations.

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