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Archaeology & Anthropology Field Schools

Atlantic Ocean - Bermuda - Field School in Underwater Archaeology - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-01

The Summer Field School in Underwater Archaeology is a research expedition conducted in Bermuda by faculty of the University of Rhode Island. The field school is a research-based learning experience that will expose students to a variety of activities including archival research, artifact conservation, archaeological survey, and underwater excavation and documentation of historic shipwrecks.

Caribbean - Antigua - Antigua Summer Archaeological Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-03-30

The Antigua Summer Field School will be in its tenth year in 2016. This summer we are providing for a rich experience in joint excavations at two separate but closely-related locations: Monk’s Fort, an 18th-century scenic fort, and bioarchaeological excavations at Galleon Beach, a burial ground for British sailors.
We welcome students from all colleges and universities to apply for the program. No experience is necessary; we take majors from all disciplines, undergraduates, non-matriculating, and graduate students.

Caribbean - Antigua - Betty's Hope Archaeological Field School - 2014

Caribbean - Antigua - Betty's Hope Archaeological Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-28

Join us this summer for an opportunity to work on the beautiful island of Antigua to excavate at Betty's Hope, a 300-year-old sugar plantation. Learn archaeological field methods while taking in Caribbean culture and history in this month-long field school.

Caribbean - Antigua Betty's Hope Archaeologiacl and Bioarchaeological Field School - 2015

Caribbean - Antigua Betty's Hope Archaeologiacl and Bioarchaeological Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-03-27

Betty's Hope will be in its ninth year in 2015, and the 2015 field season promises to be an exciting summer as we combine joint excavations at two separate but closely-related locations: a slave village at Betty’s Hope Plantation, and the bioarchaeological excavations of a nearby 18th-century burial ground for British sailors. As a former British colony, these excavations will allow us to see the important links between the sugar plantations and the protection of those interests. Students will have a full excavation experience working at one or both sites, gaining practical hands-on experience in professional field excavation of a slave village at Betty’s Hope and learning current field methodologies in bioarchaeology at the nearby beach site.

Caribbean - British Virgin Islands - Kingstown Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-06-01

This unique field school opportunity located in the Caribeean will investigate the events of Free African Communities and the lives of the African-descended peoples of the British Virgin Islands. Even after the 1838 emancipation in the British colonies, former slaves faced incredible obstacles. Many of these stemming from race-based legal restrictions aimed at keeping the economic and political slavery-era status quo intact. All of these contexts were important for the cultural life of the Caribbean, but they have received little study by historical archaeologists, who have tended to focus on large sugar plantations. The goal and responsibility of this field school is to give voice to their story and highlight their contributions to BVI and Caribbean society which were silenced by history.

Caribbean - Colonial Caribbean on St. Eustatius - 2014

Deadline
2014-08-22

Excavations will focus on the Fair Play plantation on the Caribbean island of St. Eustatius. Fair Play was an eighteenth-century plantation that consists of multiple structures including the only standing wind mill on the island.

Caribbean - Dominican Republic - ADMAT - Survey work on The 1720's Tile Wreck - 2016

Caribbean - Dominican Republic - ADMAT - Survey work on The 1720's Tile Wreck - 2016

Deadline
2016-12-30

ADMAT & ADMAT-FRANCE are running a Maritime Archaeological Project during 2016 to continue the Survey work on The Tile Wreck 1720's wreck. This is a very “hands on” field school teaching the practical aspects of maritime archaeological field work while surveying and excavating an AD 1690’s shipwreck. Full information about these projects can be found on ADMAT's website www.admat.org.uk

Caribbean - Dominican Republic - ADMAT - Survey work to locate

Caribbean - Dominican Republic - ADMAT - Survey work to locate

Deadline
2016-12-01

ADMAT & ADMAT-FRANCE are running a new Maritime Archaeological Project during 2016 to search and locate a 1750's shipwreck in the historic Monte Cristi Bay. This is a very “hands on” field school teaching the practical aspects of maritime archaeological field work. Full information about these projects can be found on ADMAT's website www.admat.org.uk

Caribbean - Dominican Republic - ADMAT's Le Casimir Wreck Maritime Project - 2014

Caribbean - Dominican Republic - ADMAT's Le Casimir Wreck Maritime Project - 2014

Deadline
2014-05-31
This is a unique opportunity to join ADMAT’s maritime archaeological project in the historic town of Monte Cristi on the north coast of the Dominican Republic. ADMAT is working with Oficina Nacional de Patrimonio Cultural Subacuático (ONPCS) Ministry of Culture to conduct a maritime archaeological survey and excavation of Le Casimir a French brig carrying perfume, wine and other cargos which was wrecked in 1829.

Caribbean - Dominican Republic - ADMAT's Le Casimir Wreck Project - 2016

Deadline
2016-11-29

ADMAT & ADMAT-FRANCE returns to Le Casimir Wreck to continue the survey and excavation of this important French brig which sunk in 1829. This is the ship carrying lead crystal perfume bottles and silver coins.

Caribbean - Grenada - Archaeology and Cultural Heritage in the Caribbean - 2014

Caribbean - Grenada - Archaeology and Cultural Heritage in the Caribbean - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-15

"Archaeology and Cultural Heritage in the Caribbean” is focused on learning fundamental skills for conducting archaeological survey and excavation, coupled with ethnographic fieldwork involving engagement with local communities, government agencies, and NGOs to examine cultural and historical resource preservation efforts and challenges. This four-week program on the island of Carriacou (Grenada) includes working with locals, students, and staff from the UK, the Netherlands, and Grenada to excavate and analyze archaeological remains that date back to the original Amerindian colonists over 1500 years ago. Students will also participate in community service activities and ethnographic fieldwork focusing on cultural heritage management in the West Indies as part of the program.

Caribbean - Nevis - Fort Charles Archaeological Project - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-28

This year's field school continues work began last year at one of the earliest British forts in the New World. Our project is the first to examine the exciting site of Fort Charles in Nevis, West Indies. This site was also home to one of the longest-lived forts in the region with an occupation history spanning two and half centuries. Preliminary analysis also suggests a unique pattern of British and African diasporan interaction at the site.

Caribbean - St. Croix - United States Virgin Islands - Excavation-Based Field School - 2014

Caribbean - St. Croix - United States Virgin Islands - Excavation-Based Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-04-10
This archaeological and bioarchaeological field school will take place at the Aklis site, a prehistoric shell midden, habitation, and cemetery site, located on the beach in Frederiksted, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. The Aklis site may represent the second Columbus landing site, but is endangered by rising sea levels. Students will gain hands on experience in excavation methods, mapping, artifact identification and classification, excavation of human skeletal material, and osteological data recording. Students will learn about the ecology, history, and culture history of St. Croix through visits to local museums and national parks, such as Buck Island Reef National Monument, Estate Whim Museum and Plantation, a paleoethnobotanical tour of the local rainforest, activities with the National Park Service and United States Fish and Wildlife Services on St. Croix, and interactions with scholars and experts on St. Croix.

Caribbean - St. Croix, US Virgin Islands - Bioarchaeology - 2016

Deadline
2016-03-04

This archaeological and bioarchaeological field school will take place at the Aklis site, a prehistoric shell midden, habitation, and cemetery site, located on the beach in Frederiksted, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. The Aklis site is being jeopardized by rising sea levels; excavations and mapping in 2016 will focus on salvaging exposed, endangered human burials and related features. Students will gain “hands-on” experience in excavation methods, mapping, artifact identification and classification, skeletal excavation, and osteological data recording. Students will also learn about the ecology, history, and prehistory of St. Croix through visits to local museums and national parks, such as Buck Island Reef National Monument, Estate Whim Museum and Plantation, a paleoethnobotanical tour of the local rainforest, activities with the National Park Service and United States Fish and Wildlife Service, and interactions with scholars and experts on St. Croix.

Caribbean - St. Croix, US Virgin Islands - Excavation Based Bioarchaeology Field School - 2015

Caribbean - St. Croix, US Virgin Islands - Excavation Based Bioarchaeology Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-02-27

This bioarchaeological and archaeological field school will take place at the Aklis site, a prehistoric shell midden, habitation, and cemetery site, located on the beach in Frederiksted, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. The Aklis site is endangered by rising sea levels. Students will gain hands on experience in excavation methods, particularly those for recovery of skeletonized human remains, artifact mapping, artifact identification and classification, and osteological inventory and data recording. Students will learn about the ecology, history, and culture history of St. Croix through visits to local museums and national parks, such as Buck Island Reef National Monument, Estate Whim Museum and Plantation, a paleoethnobotanical tour of the local rainforest, activities with the National Park Service and United States Fish and Wildlife Services on St. Croix, and interactions with scholars and experts on St. Croix.

Caribbean - The St. Eustatius Center for Archaeological Research - 2015

Deadline

The St. Eustatius Center for Archaeological research is accepting volunteers and students for the 2015 field season.

Central America - Belize - Maya Belize Archaeology Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-04-13

The Humboldt State University (HSU) Belize Archaeology Field School is a transect survey project. The project investigates hinterland communities located between two Maya administrative site centers: Dos Hombres and Gran Cacao. Field school students will receive training in archaeological excavation, field survey, total mapping station procedures, and laboratory analysis. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to visit Maya sites such as Lamanai and La Milpa. The field school offers two upper division courses: ANTH 306 Cultures of Belize and ANTH 357 Field Archaeology.

Central America - Belize - Maya Research Program's 23rd field season in Belize - 2014

Central America - Belize - Maya Research Program's 23rd field season in Belize - 2014

Deadline
2014-07-27
The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501c3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, we have sponsored archaeological fieldwork at the ancient Maya sites of Blue Creek, Nojol Nah, Xnoha, and Grey Fox in northwestern Belize. Gain experience excavating Maya architecture and learning lab techniques such as bioarchaeology, osteology, ceramics, and 3D modeling. Academic credit available. Students receive a 15% discount!
Central America - Belize - Maya Research Program's 25th archaeological field season - 2016

Central America - Belize - Maya Research Program's 25th archaeological field season - 2016

Deadline
2016-07-17
The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501C3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, we have sponsored archaeological fieldwork in northwestern Belize and ethnographic research in the village of Yaxunah, Mexico. The Maya Research Program is affiliated with the University of Texas at Tyler.

This summer marks MRP’s Blue Creek Archaeological Project’s 25th archaeological field season in northwestern Belize. MRP is proud to support a vast range of talented researchers from across the globe under this project’s umbrella. Our research associates include not only archaeologists, but also soil scientists, geoarchaeologists, geographers, conservationists, cultural anthropologists, bioarchaeologists, and botanists.

Central America - Belize - Mayan Archaeology and Culture - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-30

Under the direction of archaeologist Dr. Jaime Awe,
we will excavate and do lab work at the ancient Maya site of Cahal Pech. We will explore the Maya ruins of Xunantunich, Caracol, Tikal, Lim Ni Punit, and the Actun Tunichil Muknal Cave. We will learn Garifuna drumming, Maya herb medicines/fire hearth cooking, and chocolate making on stones.

Central America - Costa Rica - Costa Rica Tree Field Studies - 2016

Central America - Costa Rica - Costa Rica Tree Field Studies - 2016

Deadline
2016-03-12

Primate Behavior or Costa Rican Monkey Lab

This three week long course is designed to teach undergraduate and graduate students the basic skills needed for the study of wild monkeys. Students will learn to find, track and take data on White-faced Capuchins, Mantled Howlers, and Black-handed Spider Monkeys living at the Estacion Biologica El Zota, Limon Costa Rica.

Central America - Costa Rica - DANTA: Association for Conservation of the Tropics - 2016

Deadline
2016-06-01

Each year DANTA offers a number of training courses in various aspects of tropical biology. Typically, the courses are one month long but shorter courses are also offered through our organization. The courses are intended for undergraduates or early graduate level students who have a keen interest in tropical biology and conservation, but have little or no experience of working in a tropical environment. Non-students are also welcome to participate.

Central America - Costa Rica - Tree Field Studies (Tropical Research in Ecology and Ethology): Field School teaching ecology, conservation & behavior in the Tropics - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-15

Tree Field Studies (TREE: Tropical Research in Ecology and Ethology, LLC) is a small field school teaching a variety of course in the tropics.

Our principle locations are Costa Rica, Tanzania, and Panama. Our field locations in Central America are: Estacion Biologica El Zota, Cana Palma Reserve, Tortuguero, Bocas Del Toro, Panama. In Africa we teach at Udzungwa Ecological Monitoring Centre, Tanzania.

For the summer of 2014 we are offering the following courses: Primate Behavior & Ecology, Tropical Herpetology, Tropical Entomology, Tropical Ecology.

Our web address is http://treefieldstudies.wix.com/treefieldstudies

Central America - Guatemala - Mayan Ethnographic Field School in Guatemala - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-15

Participating in secret ancient indigenous rituals on cliff-tops, hunting exotic medicinal plants in forests, and projects to conserve cultural traditions are all part of the adventure. This summer abroad program gives an intimate hands-on glimpse into another culture, discover the colorful world of the mountain indigenous K’iche Maya. Stretching across a region of Guatemala’s stunning beautiful highlands, volcanoes and lowland rainforests, this course explores the dynamic interactions of human societies. Our program includes homestays with welcoming K’iche Mayan families as well as Mayan ceremonies, saunas, medicinal plant treatments, Mayan festivals, as well as learning indigenous weaving and artwork. Concurrently, through course activities, assignments, & individual projects, students develop practical skills & experience in anthropological fieldwork.

Central America - Mayan Ethnographic Field School in Guatemala -updated - 2014

Deadline
2014-04-16
ANT 390 Mayan Ethnographic Field School in Guatemala June 1 – June 21, 2014 - 3 credits Participating in secret ancient indigenous rituals on cliff-tops, hunting exotic medicinal plants in forests, and projects to conserve cultural traditions are all part of the adventure. This summer abroad program gives an intimate hands-on glimpse into another culture, discover the colorful world of the mountain indigenous K’iche Maya. Stretching across a region of Guatemala’s stunning, beautiful highlands, volcanoes, this course explores the dynamic interactions of human societies. Our program includes homestays with K’iche Mayan with the welcoming extended Leon family as well as Mayan ceremonies, saunas, medicinal plant treatments, Mayan festivals, as well as learning indigenous weaving and artwork. Concurrently, through course activities, assignments, & individual projects, students develop practical skill & experience in anthropological fieldwork.Co-director Adelphi University Anthropology Professor Douglas London has two decades of experience working with the Maya in Guatemala. Co-Director Taxa London is a Kiche Maya from Chichicastenango. Our lead teacher “Chema” is a K’iche Mayan shaman and will take you on a journey through the spiritual life of the Mayan people. Among others we will visit ancient Maya cities and ruins and one of the best-preserved colonial cities in the Americas: Antigua. For details interested students should email Professor Douglas London at dlondon@ adelphi.edu Program Cost $2150 CIE Fee $150 *Undergrad Tuition (3 cr) $2700 Total $4950 website:https://adelphi-sa.terradotta.com/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=27425

Central America - Mexico - Chiapas Bioanthropology - 2015

Deadline
2015-06-07

The Mexican Biological Variation Project is aimed at understanding the range of human biological variation both phenotypic and genotypic present in southern Mexico. Students will be broadly trained in research strategies for human biology field studies ranging from the planning stage through data analysis. These will include training in study design, human biological phenotype collection, and DNA extraction methods. Our field-school is run concurrently with the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP) that documents the experiences of migrants from Central America and beyond. A portion of the program will be dedicated to ground work for future epigenetic work among migrant populations.

Central America - Mexico - Chiapas Ethnography - 2015

Deadline
2015-06-07
Hundreds of thousands of undocumented migrants from Central America and beyond cross Mexico each year on their way to the United States. Many of these people walk across Mexico or ride on the top of dangerous cargo trains known as la bestia (“The beast”). These migrants carry backpacks loaded with food, clothing, and other provisions on their often dangerous journeys across multiple countries. Since 2009, the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP) has been using a variety of anthropological methods (e.g., ethnography, archaeology, forensic science) to understand the experiences of clandestine border crossers on the US/Mexico border and the Mexico/Guatemala border. In 2015, the UMP will begin a new project in the southern Mexican town of Palenque (Chiapas) focused on documenting the experiences of migrants preparing to cross Mexico.

Central America - Mexico - Ethnohistorical Archaeology - 2015

Deadline
The objective of this interdisciplinary project is to introduce innovative methods of integrating archaeological research with art history, ethnohistory, and ethnography, in an intensive travel study program spanning from busy Mexico City to the scenic valleys and highlands of Oaxaca and Puebla. This program runs from June 21 - July 18. It does not involve active participation in archaeological digs. Through daily traveling and hiking, students will learn about the millennial indigenous cultures, the impact of European colonialism, and the contemporary lifestyles and issues, by the active exploration of archaeological and historical sites, museum collections, and indigenous communities. These excursions will be integrated with classroom courses and on-site lectures delivered by experts on ethnohistorical documents, archaeological field and lab methods, and ethnographic research

Central America - Mexico - Ethnohistory Field Program - 2014

Deadline
2014-06-02
The purpose of this field program is to introduce students to innovative research methods in the integration of archaeology, art history, ethnohistory, and ethnography. Mexico in general and the vast state of Oaxaca in particular create an ideal research environment, where the indigenous cultures constructed monumental sites, ruled over city-states, invented complex writing systems, and crafted among the finest artistic traditions in the world, some of which are still perpetuated to this day. The clash of the Indigenous and the European worlds in the 16th century created a most unique culture, the legacy of which underlies the modern nation of Mexico. By traveling through the mountains, valleys, and coasts of Oaxaca and immersing themselves in this rich study environment, students will gain direct experience with archaeological, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic research methods and resources. In addition, the course aims to provide insights into the practicalities of conducting academic research in Mexico, by visiting research institutes and hearing on-site lectures from local experts. A broader question to be addressed is how new modes of inquiry in archaeology can reflect on approaches more consistent with the logic inherent in the scientific method. This interactive course will explore methods that avoid one-sided dependencies, and will link the past and present through the exploration of those surviving ancient sites and living communities which are directly referenced in the ethnohistorical records. Note that this Travel Study Program does not involve active participation in an archaeological dig.

Central America - Nicaragua - Archaeological Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-05-23

The 2016 summer field school will be located in the town of Boaco, a little more than an hour’s drive northeast of Managua, the capital of Nicaragua. The Boaco area is little known archaeologically. The research will focus on cross-isthmian cultural contacts as Boaco sits on two major drainages, one that flowing to the Caribbean and the other to the Pacific Ocean. Dr. Fred Lange, Visiting Associate Professor at the CSUDH will be the Project Director for a field school in Nicaraguan archaeology.The field school will include archaeological survey, test excavations, and laboratory analysis culminating in individual students research presentations.

Central America - Nicaragua - El Rayo Field School -2016

Deadline
2016-04-22

For the past 15 years, archaeologists have excavated sites along the shore of Lake Cocibolca in search of archaeological evidence for Mexican colonization. This field school will continue this quest through investigations at the site of El Rayo, the most significant site for studying the potential impact of outsiders on indigenous cultural traditions. This research project will continue a longstanding program from the University of Calgary, working in close collaboration with regional institutions including the National University of Nicaragua and Mi Museo in Granada. The core theoretical perspective focuses on the interpretation of culture change, especially ethnicity, in the centuries leading up to the Spanish Conquest in 1522 CE. As such, the results are of fundamental importance to developing claims of cultural identity by existing indigenous groups in the region. Fieldwork will consist of excavation of residential mounds where evidence of household activities and human remains has previously been observed. Students will work alongside experienced Nicaraguan archaeologists as well as Canadian and American teaching assistants. Additional 2016 field experience will include surveying to map the excavation area and relate finds with those from previously excavated areas, and field drawings of excavation units and profiles.

Central America - Panama - Chiriqui Archaeological Project - 2014

Deadline
2014-05-01

The Chiriquí Archaeological Project is proud to be one of the most economical non-profit field schools in Latin America, and one which offers transferable college credits while maintaining a very low faculty to student ratio. You will be involved in an active research project with involving excavation, survey, and lab analysis. The 2014 field school will deal with the small farmstead and hamlet sites located between the Barriles political center and the pre-Columbian village community of Pitti-González. Barriles is a large pre-Columbian center notable for its early monumentality. The site contains numerous earthen mounds, stone sculpture, and sprawling residential sectors dating primarily to the Formative period (300 B.C. to A.D. 900). Our current research questions deal with the organization of particular activities. Please visit the website for more information.

Central America - Panama - Chiriqui Archaeological Project - 2015

Deadline
2015-04-16

The Chiriquí Archaeological Project (CAP) is certified by the Register of Professional Archaeologists (RPA) and formally permitted in Panama. This active research project involves excavation, mapping, survey, and lab analysis. The 2015 field school (June 15 to July 15) will be centered upon the Barriles site, located in the highlands of western Panama (roughly 5000 feet above sea level). Barriles was a large pre-Columbian center notable for its early monumentality. The site contains several residential sectors dating primarily to the Aguas Buenas period (A.D. 300 to 900). For more information, please visit our project website at: http://scottpalumbo.wix.com/scrap

Central America - PSU Chiquilistagua, Nicaragua Archaeological Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-29

Summer 2015 will mark the second year of the Chiquilistagua Archaeological Field School directed by Dr. Justin Lowry (George Mason University) and Jason Paling (co-director -Plymouth State University). The goals of the Chiquilistagua Archaeological Project are to explore and investigate settlements in the so-called “intermediate zone,” a diverse ecological and cultural area that stretches from the southern Maya periphery in Honduras and El Salvador to the northern edges of the Great Nicoya region. Their investigations in Nicaragua are concentrated primarily in central Nicaragua from the southwestern edge of Lake Managua to the Pacific Ocean. The intent of the project is to test the validity of models proposing an association of this area with the economic and political periphery of the southern Mesoamerican people and cultures. Archaeological investigations of a recently discovered pre–Columbian settlement in Chiquilistagua, Nicaragua will help to contribute to our understanding of the variety of cultural diversity found throughout Central America. Our long term research goal is to document household activities among sites located near and around the present day town of Chiquilistagua; a settlement located approximately six kilometers southwest of the present day capital of Managua. The town and site are located on the border between the Nicaragua Depression and the Pacific Volcanic Cordillera

Central America- Panama- Sitio Drago Field School- 2014

Deadline
2014-06-21

Panama’s Caribbean Bocas del Toro Province was assumed to have been settled only 1400 years ago and to have remained isolated throughout its brief prehistory. Recent research has uncovered much evidence to the contrary. This project seeks to provide a broader range of information to better evaluate the region’s settlement history and developing social complexity. To date the Proyecto Arqueológico Sitio Drago has uncovered evidence of a much older settlement history and illustrated evidence of contact with cultures hundreds of kilometers away. The 2014 field season will focus primarily on excavation and data recovery from a mortuary area in the central part of Sitio Drago. Previous excavation has uncovered an area adjacent to 5 burials that is rich in artifacts and faunal remains indicative of some sort of ritual feasting activity. We will continue working in this area and gather data to better understand the nature of the proposed ritual behavior and social structure at the site.

Europe - Italy - Abruzzo Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-06-28

The walled, oval-shaped village of Castelvecchio Calvisio, located in central Italy’s mountainous Abruzzo region, presents evidence of human habitation dating back to the sixth century BCE (an Italic necropolis) and later to Imperial Rome. But its primary interest arises from the uniqueness of its well-preserved center, medieval in its urban plan and Renaissance in its architectural massing. The Borgo Abruzzo project provides students with a practical "laboratory" in which to develop and test methodologies, diagnostic procedures and conservation techniques through hands-on work on conservation of historic urban buildings. The research carried out in this phase will focus on better understanding the town’s architectural history through photographic and drawn surveys recorded in a customized database. These records will then form the basis for proposals for redevelopment of the town center.

South America - Argentina - Uspallata Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-06-01

The Uspallata Valley Archeology Project is a unique opportunity for students to investigate the site Cerro Tunduqueral. The deepest levels of these sites may shed light on the valley’s early occupation, which dates back to over 13,000 years, and includes the region’s earliest human occupation. Students participating in this field school will discover how hunters and gatherers moved around the landscape, how agriculturalists tapped into its rich soils, how pastoralists took llamas to pasture in secluded mountain valleys, and how these people confronted the Inca empire. The Inca’s massive territorial expansion from Cuzco ended in Uspallata, the empire’s southernmost Andean occupation.

South America - Brazil - Claudio Cutiao Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-22

On this unique field school students can join the Amazonian Interfluvial Archaeological Project in the Amazon Rainforest of Brazil to explore human occupation in a little known ecoregion of the Amazon. Travel the beaten path into the depths of the amazon to establish an archaeological understanding of the area as well as a cultural relationship between amazon boundaries. The 2016 field season will involve mapping and excavation at the archaeological site of Claudio Cutião. Our primary research objective for this season is to determine the site boundaries and its internal variability. Due to the perishable nature of building materials in the Amazon, there are no visible architectural features on the surface or below. But local soils have been enriched by organic waste and human actions and created distinct phenomena called ‘terra preta’ (‘black earth’) soils. We will examine site organization based on variations in these 'terra preta' soils as well as the distribution of artifacts.

South America - Colombia - Ciudad Perdida Filed School - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-22

Located deep in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta mountains, Teyuna-Ciudad Perdida is one of the largest sites built and inhabited by the Tayrona polities for more than a millennia prior to European contact (AD 200 to AD 1600). Students in this exciting field school will help to collect archaeological data for the purpose of illuminating the relationship of these smaller settlements to the larger urban core. Field investigations will entail site survey, mapping of inter-site flagstone paths, and shovel test excavation. Students will also be trained in artifact collection, cataloging, stratigraphic profiling, and architectural documentation.

South America - Colombia - Providencia Island - 2016

Deadline
2016-06-01

The Providencia archaeological project is the first-ever historical archaeological excavation of New Westminster. Participating students will focus on discovering the material aspects of the multicultural interactions and exchanges between the different groups on this tiny Caribbean island. Based on the historical record, the supposition is that the material culture of the islanders should reflect English lifeways. The degree of influence of Dutch, Spanish, African, and Amerindian cultures, however, must not be discounted. Historical records indicate that the rivalries on the island were intense. English indentured servants frequently found common cause with enslaved Africans, often to the point of fleeing with them off the island. Several other alliances are also mentioned in the extant historical documents, but the material dimensions of these connections are unknown - There is still much to be discovered at this site. The 2016 season aims to investigate and document the house types and the material culture of the island’s colonists. Additionally, we aim to compare these with contemporaneous structures and artifacts found at sites in Bermuda, Massachusetts, and Jamestown, Virginia.

South America - Peru - Archaeological Field School IEP Peruvian Central Coast - 2015

South America - Peru - Archaeological Field School IEP Peruvian Central Coast - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-10

The Institute of Peruvian Studies (IEP), one of the most prestigious research institutions on the social sciences in Latin America, announces the first season of its international field school in archaeological methods "Peruvian Central Coast". Based on the beach town of Punta Hermosa, the "Instituo de Estudios Peruanos" field school offers training in mapping, recording and excavation techniques in the field as well as basic training via onsite workshops on statistical sampling in archaeology , bioarchaeological analysis, ceramic analysis and cataloguing, and lithic analysis.

South America - Peru - Huari - Ancash Archaeological Research Project Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-29

The aim of this archaeology and bioarchaeology field school is to learn of the lifestyle of the prehispanic population in Peru Highlands. Our project revolves around funeral aspects and ancestral cults. We are undertaking archaeological excavations in order to obtain information which helps us understand these subjects.The project is supported by Instituto de Estudios Huarinos under direction of Bebel Ibarra Asencios, Researcher of Department of Anthropology. Tulane University.

South America - Peru - Huari - Ancash Bioarchaeologcal Project. Peru - 2014

Deadline
2014-07-04

The aim of this archaeology and bioarchaeology field school is to learn of the lifestyle of the prehispanic population in Peru Highlands. Our project revolves around funeral aspects and ancestral cults. We are undertaking archaeological excavations in order to obtain information which helps us understand these subjects.The project is supported by Instituto de Estudios Huarinos under direction of Bebel Ibarra Asencios, Researcher of Department of Anthropology. Tulane University.

South America - Perú - Huari-Ancash Bio-Archaeological Research Project Field School 2016. Perú - 2016

Deadline
2016-06-30

The aim of this archaeology and bioarchaeology field school is to learn of the lifestyle of the prehispanic population in Peru Highlands. Our project revolves around funeral aspects and ancestral cults. We are undertaking archaeological excavations in order to obtain information which helps us understand these subjects.The project is supported by Instituto de Estudios Huarinos under direction of Bebel Ibarra Asencios, Researcher of Department of Anthropology. Tulane University.

South America - Peru - Inca Highway, Jungle, & Ritual Human Sacrifice- 2016

Deadline
2016-04-30

Experience Machu Picchu, Cuzco, The Sacred Valley, Ollantaytambo, Saqsaywaman, Pisac, Temple of the Moon, Puerto Maldonado and the Amazon jungle. A rich blend of Inca and Christian cultures are examined. The Qhapag Nan, the Great Inca and Pre Inca Highway will be highlighted. Stay a few nights in the heart of the Amazon rain forest fishing for piranha, snatching baby gators from the lake, and trade and barter with the Jungle Tribes. In the north of Peru at Lambayeque we will work with Dr. Haagen Klaus a renowned Bio-archaeologist and the author of Ritual Violence in the Andes. He excavates and studies victims of ritual violence and sacrifice.

South America - Peru - Moche UNC-Chapel Hill Archaeological Field School in Peru - 2014

South America - Peru - Moche UNC-Chapel Hill Archaeological Field School in Peru - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-01

Interested in spending a month in Peru excavating an ancient town? Come work with MOCHE!

Learn how to excavate ancient houses and how to analyze artifacts; visit world-famous archaeological sites and learn about the prehistory of Peru; tour the northern highlands of Peru and visit the historic town of Cajamarca.

Earn 6 semester hours of UNC-Chapel Hill credit for Anthropology 453
No prerequisites. Spanish not required. Non-majors accepted. Contact us about our volunteer program (for those with previous experience only).

South America - Peru - MOCHE-UNC Archaeology Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-01

This field school provides students with the opportunity to learn archaeological excavation and laboratory methods as well as receive instruction on the prehistory of Peru. The program begins with workshops on archaeological methods and the prehistory of Peru, after which, students are prepared to work five days a week in the field, excavating elite and commoner households at the Quebrada del León archeological complex. We spend a few hours on Saturdays touring local archaeological sites including Huaca del Sol and Chan Chan, and Sundays are free days in Huanchaco. We also take a long-weekend to tour the famous sites of Túcume, El Brujo and Sípan located north of Trujillo.

South America - Peru - MOCHE-Wagner College Bioarchaeology Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-31

This field school provides beginning students with the opportunity to learn human the basics of human osteological methods, and provides advanced training for students with previous experience. In addition, students will receive instruction on the prehistory of the north coast of Peru. Students work five days a week in the lab, inventorying human remains, estimating age-at-death and sex, as well as collecting health data. We spend a few hours on Saturdays touring local archaeological sites including Huaca del Sol and Chan Chan, and Sundays are free days in Huanchaco.

South America - Peru - Sondor Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-22

This is a bioarchaeology field school to investigate what happened to the Chanka society of ancient Peru after their defeat by the Inca Empire. Students will participate in excavations, laboratory analyses, and develop skills to interpret multiple data sets and test working theories.

South America - Peru - Taraco Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-06-08

The northern Titicaca area, located in the department of Puno, Peru, is one of the few areas in the world where complex societies independently arose. The archaeological site of Taraco, located on the edge of the Ramís River in the far northern Basin, was one of a few political and economic centers in the region during the late Middle Formative (ca. 1300-500 BCE). The importance of this site, together with its long, uninterrupted occupation, makes it an ideal locale to study processes of increasing social and political complexity in detail. In the 2014 season we will focus on understanding the development of non-domestic, public forms of architecture at Taraco. The relationship between so-called “corporate” architecture and increasing social and political complexity is well established in the northern Basin, and figures prominently in the wider anthropological and archaeological literature. We will continue our excavation of a sunken court complex situated on the Huayra Mocco Mound (Area I), located across the river from Area A. These excavations will allow us to assess the degree to which Taraco’s political and economic success during the Formative Period was linked to the intensification of civic-ceremonial activities, or with transformations in their forms and organization.

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