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Archaeology & Anthropology Field Schools

Anthropology (83/- )

Bioanthropology (62/- )

Classical Archaeology (135/- )

Classical archaeology is the archaeological investigation of the great Mediterranean civilizations o

Data Visualization (3D, Animation, etc) (41/- )

Ethnographic (52/- )

Experimental (8/- )

Forensic (46/- )

Geoarchaeology (64/- )

Geophysics (52/- )

GIS (66/- )

Historic Archaeology (267/- )

Nautical (57/- )

Prehistoric & Historic Archaeology (177/- )

Prehistoric Archaeology (259/- )

Historic Archaeology

Rock art (20/- )

Volunteer (124/- )

Zooarchaeology (44/- )

Middle East - Israel -  Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project

Middle East - Israel - Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project

Deadline
Tel Bet Yerah (Khirbet Kerak) is a large mound dramatically situated on the Sea of Galilee at the outlet of the River Jordan, in Israel. Occupied throughout the Early Bronze Age (3500 – 2300 BCE) and sporadically in later times, Bet Yerah is the type site for Khirbet Kerak Ware, a unique ceramic industry created by EBA migrants with roots in Transcaucasia. In 2010 we will continue to investigate the monumental ‘Circles Building’(granary?) in its urban context, excavating nearby paved streets and domestic complexes dating to the EB III (about 2700 BCE). We will also renew excavations in the recently identified Umayyad palace of the 7th – 8th centuries CE. (http://www.tau.ac.il/humanities/archaeology/projects/betyerah). The archaeological Field School will be held in conjunction with the Archaeological Geophysics Field School at Tel Bet Yerah.

Middle East - Israel - Marj Rabba Archaeological Field School - 2012

Deadline
2012-04-02

The enigmatic Chalcolithic period (c. 4500-3700 BC) in the southern Levant (Israel, Jordan, Palestine) was a time when new burial practices, ritual centers and expanding networks for the trade of gold, obsidian, copper and ivory attest to widespread, fundamental changes in these pre-biblical societies. The first copper metallurgy begins, primarily for status items rather than functional tools. Cemeteries separate from villages, some with rich funeral goods, underscore changes in rites practiced in order to cope with new perceptions about life and death. This new project is designed to lead a multi-disciplinary research team to the Galilee, Israel in order to investigate the dramatic change in the relationship of villages, ritual sites and cemeteries during this little known period.

Middle East - Israel - Tel Bet Yerah Geophysics Archaeological Project

Middle East - Israel - Tel Bet Yerah Geophysics Archaeological Project

Deadline
This field school will introduce students to archaeogeophysical methods, which allow us to “see” archaeological features buried beneath the ground surface. Students will be given hands-on instruction in these methods in the context of the ongoing Tel Bet Yerah Research and Excavation Project (TBYREP). Dramatically situated on the southern shore of the Sea of Galilee, Israel, Tel Bet Yerah is the site of a large fortified Early Bronze Age town. In 2010 we will explore a large expanse of the site where virtually nothing is known about the subsurface, and image areas where monumental structures and waterworks may be located. The Archaeological Geophysics Field School will be held in conjunction with the Archaeological Field School at Tel Bet Yerah.

Middle East - Israel - Tel Dor Archaeological Excavation and Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-02-28

From July 1 to August 8, the University of Washington Tel Dor Archaeological Program will resume its field school excavation at Dor under the director of Professor Sarah Stroup.

The UW Team will continue excavating, under the instruction of prof. Stroup (assisted by Israeli grad students fluent in English), the impressive and archaeologically-rich Hellenistic and Persian period buildings on the south side of the Tel ('Area D4'). This area, which we have been excavating since 2005, consists of a fascinating complex of large public buildings likely connected with Dor's focus as a center of coastal Mediterranean trade and industry.

Middle East - Israel - Tel Dor, Field School: Hebrew U. Rothberg International School or Haifa University

Middle East - Israel - Tel Dor, Field School: Hebrew U. Rothberg International School or Haifa University

Deadline
2010-05-01

An important site with natural harbors on the north and south sides of the site(today beautiful, white sand, swimming beaches), Dor preserves a continuous sequence from the Bronze Age through the Late Roman period. City fortifications plus residential, industrial, and public buildings including temples allow us to reconstruct life in the town for each period. Monday through Friday we dig in the morning, and Monday through Thursday we continue the day with processing and analysis of pottery and bone with experts in the afternoon followed by presentations delivered by excavation staff and affiliated archaeologists and scientists.

Middle East - Israel - The Jezreel Valley Regional Project: Tel Megiddo East - 2012

Deadline
2012-05-01

Join us for the excavation of the city of the Great Temple builders!

Centuries before the pyramids of Egypt rose along the Nile, the inhabitants of Megiddo organized themselves into a massive city and began construction on a monumental home for their revered god. This temple would be one of the most ambitious construction projects in the Levant, and the city responsible for it would be the earliest and largest urban formation for hundreds of miles.

This 5,000-year-old temple has now been revealed through excavations at Tel Megiddo. The temple complex consists of an artificial platform supported by a 4m-wide stone wall. This platform elevates the largest single edifice of the period in the entire Levant, the “Great Temple.” This massive broad-room temple is some 50 meters wide and more than 30 meters long. The structure features 3.5-meter-thick walls enclosing hallways stacked high with the bone refuse from animal sacrifices. The sanctuary is stunningly appointed with twelve 1-ton basalt slabs carved into rectangular and circular shapes which appear to have been used as ritual tables. Perhaps most amazing is the perfection with which the temple was planned, engineered, and constructed. Its plan is meticulously laid out such that the thicknesses of walls and their distance from each other are exact in every dimension. This is strong evidence for the birth of the disciplines of architecture and engineering, intellectual pursuits supported by a well-organized government.

The magnificent temple is now well-known but the larger urban landscape, the home of its builders, has never been explored. Archaeological survey, 2010 excavations, and GPR survey by the JVRP indicated that a large and contemporaneous settlement lies across the modern highway from the remarkable remains of the Megiddo temple. It is the concentration of human resources in this city that led directly or indirectly to the extraordinary architectural florescence on the tel.

In 2011, the JVRP began full-scale excavations of the EB city revealing houses, grain storage facilities, and large terrace walls supporting major structures contemporary with the Great Temple. This season, the JVRP will continue its exploration of the city of the Great Temple Builders, focusing on several new areas that have never been investigated before!

Middle East - Israel - The Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project - 2012

Middle East - Israel - The Tel Bet Yerah Archaeological Project - 2012

Deadline
2012-06-01

Tel Bet Yerah (Khirbet Kerak) is a large mound at the outlet of the River Jordan, Israel.Occupied throughout the Early Bronze Age, students will excavate a granary, plaza and houses.

Middle East - Israel - The University of Haifa 2010 Fieldschool in Archaeology at Tel Dor

Middle East - Israel - The University of Haifa 2010 Fieldschool in Archaeology at Tel Dor

Deadline
2010-05-15
Enjoy the Thrill of Discovery and help us unravel the secrets of Tel Dor, Israel under the Sea People, Phoenicians, Israelites and the Hellenistic and Roman Empires. Excavate with us in our 2010 (30th!) excavation season, July 6 - August 12 and earn academic credits.

Middle East - Israel - UW Tel Dor Archaeological Excavation and Field School

Deadline
2010-03-15

The Tel Dor Field School at the University of Washington is a one-of-a-kind program that instructs its students in modern archaeological technique, brings these students into the field as valued members of an international archaeological team, and provides an experience that will last a lifetime. Participants in the field school, working and studying daily with students and scholars from Israel and around the world, are moved from the role of student to that of archaeologist and fellow researcher. Each day on the Tel we uncover the past, learn more about the present, and add forever to our knowledge of the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. Come dig with us!

Middle East - Israel - UW Tel Dor Archaeological Excavations and Field School - 2011

Deadline
2011-03-15

The UW Tel Dor Field School 2011: From June 28 to August 8, 2011, the University of Washington Tel Dor Archaeological Program will resume its field school excavation at Dor under the director of Professor Sarah Culpepper Stroup. Come Dig with Us, Come Learn with Us, Come Explore with Us!

Middle East - Jordan - Dhiban Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-22

Students will excavate in one ofJordan's most important historical sites. The Dhiban Excavation and Development Project has been working to understand the rich and complex archaeological record and preserve and develop this record as an economic and heritage resource for the future.

Middle East - Jordan - Edom Lowlands Regional Archaeology Project

Deadline
2011-06-03

The key focus of the UC San Diego Edom Lowlands Regional Archaeology Project (ELRAP) is a deep-time study of the role of mining and metallurgy on cultural evolution. ELRAP is unique because of our focus on developing and using a high-tech, on-site digital archaeology system, which allows students to master a wide array of digital survey and recording tools.

The 2011 season will primarily be devoted to exploring the social and political evolution of the Iron Age kingdom of Edom. The focus will be on landscape archaeology, and will include both cutting-edge noninvasive survey techniques and test soundings. Students will have the opportunity to participate in ELRAP surveys dedicated to investigating Early Bronze Age, Iron Age, Nabataean period and Islamic period settlement in Faynan.

Middle East – Turkey – Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project - 2013

Deadline
2013-02-15

The Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project (ACARP) announces its third archaeological field school for the summer of 2013.  Antiochia ad Cragum is located on the south-central coast of Turkey in ancient Rough Cilicia.  The Project is currently excavating a third-century AD Imperial temple, a colonnaded street, and a major bath complex that includes a large mosaic.  In 2013, in addition to continued work on the Temple and Bath Complex, we plan to begin work on the city’s Agora or marketplace.

Middle East/Africa - Kenya - Koobi Fora Field School - 2013

Middle East/Africa - Kenya - Koobi Fora Field School - 2013

Deadline
2013-03-15

So you want to hunt for evidence of our earliest ancestors?... Welcome to Koobi Fora.

The National Museums of Kenya and George Washington University’s Center for the Advanced Study of Hominin Paleobiology have teamed up to provide you with a unique opportunity to explore some of the most remote parts of Africa and search for evidence of hominins in the most dramatic landscapes you will ever experience.

Apply to be a part of the Koobi Fora Field School, the premier paleoanthropology training experience. Our team of experts from all over the world have begun conducting exciting new field projects that you can be a part of. Field projects include:
- Studying fossilized footprints from 1.6 million years ago
- Finding evidence of human scavenging and hunting 2.0 million years ago
- Exploring evidence of climate change and animal communities over the last 4 million years
- Discovering the changes associated with the emergence of domesticated animals in East Africa

Our faculty include the foremost experts in hominin physiology, Paleolithic archaeology, landscape archaeology, zooarchaeology, bioarchaeology and many more.

Join us to be a part of the exciting new research. A life changing experience awaits you on the shores of Lake Turkana…

North America - Alaska - Subarctic Archaeology at Mead Site, Alaska (UAF) - 2016

Deadline
2016-05-04

Mead site is a multicomponent site consisting of at least 4 components dating from 14,000 to 1,400 years ago in deeply buried stratified contexts in the mid Tanana Basin, near Delta Junction, Alaska. This site has received little investigation given its importance in the early prehistory of northwest North America, but initial excavations have yielded lithic tools, organic tools, and faunal remains from multiple components. Along with Broken Mammoth and Swan Point, this is one of the oldest sites in northwest North America, and indeed in the Western Hemisphere. The presence of faunal remains and lithic artifacts within stratified contexts provides an opportunity to document patterning in site use and test hypotheses about technology, subsistence, and settlement of ancient populations in Interior Alaska. We will investigate an area where we recovered the earliest Art (decorated antler pendants) in northern North America.

The 2016 excavation and field school at Mead is designed to better understand activity areas and technological and subsistence change through time. Specifically, we will focus on areas of the site where we recovered numerous faunal remains (bison, waterfowl, small game, and fish) dating to ~12,500 cal BP, that may represent multiple ancient house floors.

North America  - Yukon - Field School in Subarctic Archaeology and Ethnography - 2012

North America - Yukon - Field School in Subarctic Archaeology and Ethnography - 2012

Deadline
2012-05-01
An introduction to archaeological and ethnographic field methods as currently practiced in Yukon—that is, as an integrated program of documentation of local culture-history with a strong community presence in the research activities. Principal excavations of 12000 to 14,000 years old Beringian deposits at the Little John site, archaeological survey around the Yukon - Alaska borderlands, and ethnographic work with the White River First Nation of Beaver Creek.

North America - New Mexico - Chaco Research Semester - 2013

Deadline
2013-08-01

Chaco research immersion course. Field session (5 weeks in Sept./Oct.) plus an advanced laboratory class and a topical seminar. Contact the Anthropology Dept. at the University of New Mexico for a detailed PDF flyer (ajls@unm.edu)

North America - Alabama - Fort Tombecbe - 2014

Deadline
2014-04-14
The 2014 University of West Alabama field school at colonial Fort Tombecbe is May 18-June 14. Excavations will focus on the French period (1736-1763) bakery, barracks and contemporaneous Choctaw materials. Students will become familiar with the tools of archaeology and methods of controlled excavation, pedestrian surveys, lab processing, and public interpretation. Specific skills to be covered include using a total station, profiling, soil description, recording archaeological data, and the particulars of excavating a historical, multi-ethnicity frontier site.
North America - Alabama - Fort Tombecbe Archaeological Project - 2012

North America - Alabama - Fort Tombecbe Archaeological Project - 2012

Deadline
2012-04-18
The 2012 University of West Alabama archaeological field school is May 21 – June 16 at the 18th century colonial French, British, and Spanish Fort Tombecbe site. The course (AN 401) emphasizes archaeolog
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ical excavation techniques, with a secondary focus on survey and mapping.
North America - Alaska - Adelphi Archaeology Field School - 2013

North America - Alaska - Adelphi Archaeology Field School - 2013

Deadline
2013-03-11
The Adelphi University Department of Anthropology will initiate summer 2013 archaeological field reconnaissance and site excavations at multiple sites in the Susitna River valley. In addition to participation in an ongoing research program, students will experience unspoiled Alaska wilderness, acquire important technological skills using state-of-the-art research technologies, and learn the fundamentals of archaeological excavation.
North America - Alaska - Adelphi in Alaska Field and Lab Techniques in Archaeology - 2013

North America - Alaska - Adelphi in Alaska Field and Lab Techniques in Archaeology - 2013

Deadline
2013-03-16
University students interested in archaeology or environmental science are encouraged to attend the Adelphi Archaeological Field School in Alaska. Experience pristine wilderness, participate in ongoing research, and make new discoveries. Research will focus on two prehistoric sites in the Susitna Valley including the 10,000-year-old occupation at Trapper Creek Overlook and a variety of other late-prehistoric complex hunter-gatherer sites. Undergraduate students can enroll in 4 credits and contribute to a multi-year research program. Learn archaeological methods involving 21st century field-based technologies including GPS, GIS, and total station. In addition to a true wilderness experience, students learn basic principles of site mapping, excavation, and soil formation as well as orienteering, survey, and cultural diversity. Enjoy “off the grid” camping and backpacking and explore the ancient past.
North America - Alaska - Advanced Archaeology Field School - 2015

North America - Alaska - Advanced Archaeology Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-03-25

Set in the Alaskan wilderness, students will join a research team to investigate prehistoric cultures, improve analytical abilities through the recovery and study of complex archeological evidence including geological soil formations and artifact spatial context. Gain hands on experience operating specialized equipment and learn to locate new sites through survey.

North America - Alaska - Archaeology Field School - 2015

North America - Alaska - Archaeology Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-03-25

Travel to Alaska to participate in an ongoing research program and experience unspoiled wilderness, acquire important technological skills using state-of-the-art research technologies, and learn the fundamentals of archaeological excavation. Students will acquire skills in archaeological excavation, survey, mapping, and orienteering as well as historic preservation and compliance regulations.

North America - Alaska - Archaeology Field School in Quinhagak, Alaska, Nunalleq Project - 2015

North America - Alaska - Archaeology Field School in Quinhagak, Alaska, Nunalleq Project - 2015

Deadline
2015-05-01

The University of Aberdeen Department of Archaeology and its partnering institutions are working in association with the Yup’ik Eskimo village of Quinhagak and Qanirtuuq, Inc. to save their archaeological heritage threatened by melting permafrost and rising levels of the Bering Sea.

North America - Alaska - Late Pleistocene Archaeology Field School in the Tanana Valley

Deadline

University students interested in archaeology or cultural resource management are encouraged to apply for the 2016 Adelphi in Alaska Archaeological Field School. With an instructor-to-student ratio among the lowest available, you will experience a vast wilderness, participate in ongoing research, and make new discoveries. Research will focus on the newly discovered Holzman site along Shaw Creek where large mammal bones, mammoth ivory fragments, and stone tools have been found dating back to the end of the last Ice Age. Join our research team in the scenic Tanana Valley as we investigate the question, who were the First Alaskans? Undergraduate students can enroll in 4 credits and contribute to a multi‐year research program. Learn archaeological methods involving 21st century field‐based technologies including GPS, GIS, and total station. In addition to a true wilderness experience, students learn basic principles of site mapping, excavation, and soil formation as well as orienteering, professional survey, and remote living. Enjoy Alaska camping and explore the ancient past!

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch - 2012

Deadline
2012-03-17
The University of Arizona School of Anthropology will conduct its second field season at Rock Art Ranch for undergraduate and graduate students at all skill levels. Participants will learn survey, lab, and excavation techniques. The ranch contains some of the Southwest’s most spectacular rock art dating from 6000 BCE to 1300 CE. Project goals are to gain an understanding of how the landscape was used by groups over the past 8000 years, how and why groups migrated to and from the area, and what role the rock art played in communicating identity and ownership.

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch - 2015

Deadline
2015-03-13

The University of Arizona School of Anthropology will be conducting its fifth field season at Rock Art Ranch during the first summer session of 2015 (June 1 through July 4) for undergraduate and graduate students at all skill levels. The participants will learn both archaeological survey and excavation techniques. For survey, participants will learn site identification, location and mapping using GPS and total station; artifact identification, collection and processing; soil and plant identification; and artifact analysis and sourcing. For excavation, the participants will learn site and feature identification, the principles of stratigraphy and their application to the archaeological record, seriation techniques, artifact identification and typology, and basic laboratory procedures. Finally, students will be shown how by combining the techniques of survey and excavation, a more complete understanding of human society in the past can be achieved.

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool - 2014

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-14

Rock Art Ranch is a private ranch 25 miles southeast of Winslow, AZ. The ranch contains some of the Southwest’s most spectacular rock art dating from 6000 BC to AD 1300. The ranch lies in the high desert at 5100’ elevation, in an area used over the past 8000 years by mobile hunting and gathering groups, early farmers, and later, after A.D. 500, by more sedentary farmers representing archaeological cultures of the adjacent Mogollon Rim and Colorado Plateau regions. For 2014, the goals are to document how the landscape was used by groups over the past 8000 years, how and why groups migrated to and from the area, and what role the rock art played in communicating identity and ownership. Excavations have already helped develop a tighter chronology for the area and provided details on length of site occupation and subsistence base. Survey by fieldschool participants have located 95 new sites in three summers that cluster in three time periods: Basketmaker II (early agricultural), 1000 BCE-500 CE; Basketmaker III/Pueblo I, 600-900 CE; and Pueblo III, 1100-1250 CE. It is the BMII groups who carved most of the petroglyphs.

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool REU - 2014

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool REU - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-14

Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, has received an NSF-REU (National Science Foundation Research Enrichment for Undergraduate students) grant for 2014-2016 to provide five weeks of hands-on experience in doing field archaeology followed by two weeks of training in four research labs at ASM on the UA campus for eligible undergraduate students. Students accepted into this program for 2014 will be paid $500/week for seven weeks and have their travel and basic living expenses paid as well.
The purpose of the program is to use archaeology as a vehicle to expose underserved students to how science is used to explore and understand the world around them. Equally as important is to expose students to potential career opportunities and to provide them with much needed experience to make them more competitive in the work place.

North America - Arizona - Rock Art Ranch REU – 2016

Deadline
2016-03-18

The University of Arizona School of Anthropology will be conducting its sixth field season at Rock Art Ranch from June 6 through July 22 for undergraduate students from underserved groups with little exposure or experience with STEM curriculum. The participants will learn both archaeological survey and excavation techniques. For survey, participants will learn site identification, location and mapping using GPS and total station; artifact identification, collection and processing; soil and plant identification; and artifact analysis and sourcing. For excavation, the participants will learn site and feature identification, the principles of stratigraphy and their application to the archaeological record, seriation techniques, artifact identification and typology, and basic laboratory procedures. Finally, students will be shown how by combining the techniques of survey and excavation, a more complete understanding of human society in the past can be achieved.

North America - Arizona - Shivwits 2014 Archaeological Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-04-30

The Department of Anthropology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas will offer a six-credit, five-week field school from June 8 to July 12, 2014. Investigations will focus on late Pueblo II/early Pueblo III (A.D. 1150-1200) sites associated with the Virgin Anasazi culture. Students will learn the fundamentals of archaeological excavation techniques, mapping, record-keeping, and material processing and identification.

North America - Arizona - The Undocumented Migration Project: Archaeology of the Contemporary Arizona Field School - 2012

North America - Arizona - The Undocumented Migration Project: Archaeology of the Contemporary Arizona Field School - 2012

Deadline
2012-02-01
Since the mid-1990’s, hundreds of thousands of undocumented migrants from Mexico and beyond have been entering the United States on foot through Arizona. Hundreds of migrant stations have been identified in southern Arizona. Using traditional archaeological analytical methods and ethnography, this project examines migrant material culture to understand many aspects of this clandestine cultural phenomenon.

North America - Arizona - University of Arizona Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool - 2016

Deadline
2016-03-18

The University of Arizona School of Anthropology’s Rock Art Ranch Fieldschool will conduct its sixth summer of fieldwork from June 6 to July 9, 2016. The fieldschool is for undergraduate and graduate students at all skill levels. The participants will learn both archaeological survey and excavation techniques. For survey, participants will learn site identification, location and mapping using GPS and a total station; artifact identification, collection and processing; soil and plant identification; and artifact analysis and sourcing. For excavation, the participants will learn mapping at all levels of the site, feature identification, the principles of stratigraphy and their application to the archaeological record, seriation techniques, artifact identification and typology, and basic laboratory procedures. Finally, students will be shown how by combining the techniques of survey and excavation, a more complete understanding of human society in the past can be achieved.

North America - Bering Sea, Alaska; Quinhagak Fieldschool; University of Aberdeen - 2012

North America - Bering Sea, Alaska; Quinhagak Fieldschool; University of Aberdeen - 2012

Deadline
2012-05-15

The University of Aberdeen Department of Archaeology, in partnership with the Yup’ik Eskimo village of Quinhagak, will excavate the Nunalleq site, a late prehistoric village. Preservation conditions are exceptional with features and artifacts abundant. We will live and work alongside Yup’ik culture bearers in a spectacular wilderness setting.

North America - Binghamton University John Moore Farm Field School (Prehistoric) - 2012

Deadline
2012-05-07

The prehistoric John Moore Farm site on the Susquehanna River in Binghamton, NY is part of a series of camps created around 1500 B.C. (Transitional Period).

North America - California - 8th Applied Archaeology Field School - 2014

North America - California - 8th Applied Archaeology Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-07-03

In 2014, the San Bernardino National Forest, San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, and California State University San Bernardino are offering the Eighth Applied Archaeology Field School. The class will run from Monday through Friday for five weeks, beginning on July 14, 2014 and continuing through August 15, 2014. Our field school will provide you with all of the field training and experience you will need to get your first job as an archaeological technician with state or federal agencies, or with private cultural resource management firms. These are the same basic skills you will need in order to conduct research archaeology. This is a "hands-on" field school; you will learn by doing. We stress teamwork, cooperation, and accomplishment.

North America - California - Applied Archaeology Field School-San Bernardino National Forest - 2016

Deadline
2016-07-01
Taught by current and former US Forest Service archaeologists, this course is designed for students interested in careers in applied archaeology and cultural resource management. You will learn essential, fundamental skills associated with archaeological survey, site recording, and excavation. You will learn about the laws and processes that apply to archaeology and cultural resource management in the public and private sector. The skills you will learn are equally applicable to research archaeology anywhere in the world. The course will be held in the San Jacinto Mountains of southern California near Idyllwild. A week of classroom activities will be followed by four weeks of survey and excavation. At a minimum students should be prepared to hike five miles a day over broken terrain in temperatures that may exceed 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

North America - California - CSU Channel Islands Archaeological Field School - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-15

In collaboration with Channel Islands National Park and California State Parks, participants will be involved with documentation, mapping, and excavation of prehistoric and historic sites in two beautiful coastal locations: Santa Rosa Island and Point Mugu State Park. Through field training, lectures, and other coursework, students will be exposed to techniques and strategies common to compliance-based archaeology in the United States.

North America - California - Mono Mills Historical Archaeology Project - 2012

North America - California - Mono Mills Historical Archaeology Project - 2012

Deadline
2012-06-01

This field school will engage students in hands-on archaeological study at a historic, Gold Rush town in California. The town was occupied from 1880-1915 and was a pluralistic community made up of Kuzedika Paiute, Chinese, and Euro-American settlers.

Highlights of the field school include training in excavation and artifact recovery, surface survey, non-invasive technologies including ground penetrating radar, site map development, artifact analysis, documentary and archival research, and oral history interviews.

North America - California - New River Mining District 2015 Summer Field Program - 2015

North America - California - New River Mining District 2015 Summer Field Program - 2015

Deadline
2015-06-06
The New River Mining District is located in the western Trinity Alps. During the 1880s the New River was settled by Californian hard rock miners. Immigrants to the New River region constructed three major town sites and numerous hard rock mines in the surrounding area. The New River Mining District (NRMD) 2015 Archaeological Field Program will teach interns archaeological survey, laboratory, and excavation techniques. The NRMD field program will take place between July 13th and August 21st of 2015. During this time period students will have the opportunity to take part in an archaeological project in the backcountry of Trinity County, CA. Interns will be taught through hands-on field experience and a series of lectures focused on archaeological method and theory.

North America - California - Pimu Catalina Island Archaeological Field School - 2014

Deadline
2014-03-07
Santa Catalina Island is an important hub for the intermingling of people and the exchange of ideas and objects. Surrounded by rich marine and lithic resources, Island people were contributors to an extensive trade network throughout southern California and the Southwest. The Pimu Catalina Island Archaeological Field School is run in partnership with California State University Northridge (CSUN) each student is awarded 8 semester credit units. This field school is also a collaborative project between the Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Project, the Catalina Island Conservancy, the University of Southern California and members of the Gabrielino (Tongva) Nation.
North America - California - Pimu Catalina Island Archaeological Field School - 2015

North America - California - Pimu Catalina Island Archaeological Field School - 2015

Deadline
2015-04-01

The Pimu Catalina Island Archaeological Field School is run in partnership with California State University Northridge (CSUN) and each student is awarded 8 semester credit units. This field school is also a collaborative project between the Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Project, the Catalina Island Conservancy, the University of Southern California and members of the Gabrielino (Tongva) Nation.

North America - California - Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Project - 2012

North America - California - Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Project - 2012

Deadline
2012-05-01
The Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Project provides a RPA certified field school where students are immersed in 9,000 years of cultural history while developing field and lab skills as well as the application of cultural resource law and policies with lectures by local experts, Tongva professionals, and researchers.

North America - California - Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Project Field School - 2013

Deadline
2013-02-15

Santa Catalina Island is an important hub for the intermingling of people and the exchange of ideas and objects. Surrounded by rich marine and lithic resources, Island people were contributors to an extensive trade network throughout southern California and the Southwest. The Pimu Catalina Island Archaeological Field School is run in partnership with California State University Northridge (CSUN) each student is awarded 8 semester credit units.

North America - California - Prehistory/Paleoecology of the Southern Sierra Nevada - 2016

Deadline
2016-04-25

The University of Nevada, Reno and the Sequoia National Forest are presenting an archaeological field school in Californian prehistory and paleoecology. It will take place in the beautiful southern Sierra Nevada of southeastern California.

North America - California - Santa Clara University Field School in Historical Archaeology - 2012

North America - California - Santa Clara University Field School in Historical Archaeology - 2012

Deadline
The 2012 Santa Clara University summer field school in historical archaeology offers students hands-on training in archaeological methods in the heart of Silicon Valley. Excavations will be focused on areas inhabited by the Native Americans who lived at the Spanish colonial mission of Santa Clara de Asis.

North America - California - UC Davis 2013 California and Great Basin Field School

Deadline
2013-04-26

The 2013 UC Davis field school will take place in Colusa County near Williams, California and in Fish Lake Valley on the California-Nevada border. The field school will continue UC Davis' tradition of offering a well-rounded training program in archaeological field work. Students will be instructed in archaeological survey and excavation techniques. The six week course may also include guest lectures from visiting professors and other professionals and will give 9 quarter units of credit.

North America - California - UC Davis California and Great Basin Field School - 2013

Deadline
2013-04-26

A six-week field course including three weeks of excavation in Central California and three weeks of survey in the western Great Basin.

North America - California - US Forest Service/San Manuel Band Applied Archaeology Field School - 2013

Deadline
2013-06-26

The San Bernardino National Forest, San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, and California State University San Bernardino are offering an Applied Archaeology Field School designed to provide you with the skills you will need to get a job with a cultural resource management firm or government agency

North America - California - Wind Wolves Preserve Archaeological Field School - 2012

North America - California - Wind Wolves Preserve Archaeological Field School - 2012

Deadline
2012-07-01
Located in the heart of interior South-Central California, the Wind Wolves Preserve lies at the interface between several rich habitats and contains some of the most spectacular examples of Native American paintings found anywhere in North America.Students will investigate rock-art, habitation and special purpose sites.
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